Weather Moderation: Drawing Rain Using Biodynamic Preparations

Biodynamic Preparations and Drought

Hugh Lovel

How certain notions arise and become entrenched is a bit of a mystery, especially when they are wrong. Yet they do get started and entrenched. One of these is the belief that when things dry up and little moisture is available we cannot put out biodynamic preparations—as if these were delicate microbial cultures that must have moist conditions to establish and thrive. This is so far from true it seems impossible that it ever got started. Yet it did.

Etheric Force flows from lower concentration to higher concentration

Etheric Force flows from lower concentration to higher concentration

Steiner’s agriculture course is rather difficult to read because even though
he sketches the broadest outlines-such as categorizing lunar forces as
compared to Saturn forces, or earthly forces as compared to cosmic
forces–he does not explain things in detail in ways that we with our
current cultural frame of reference find easy to grasp.

It may seem like the moon forces are working downward, as that is partly
their effect. However, seeds planted just prior to full moon come up quicker
and those planted just prior to new moon come up noticeably slower but have
more root development. Just how is it the moon forces work?

In general, etheric force flows from lower concentration to higher
concentration. This means they flow into the solar system as warmth from
beyond Saturn, through Jupiter, Mars, etc. gradually condensing into light
as they converge on the sun and are reflected back via Mercury, Venus and
the Moon. The process (ethers are dynamic, and thus are processes) involved
with Mercury is digestion, which is a chemical process and thus involve
tone. With Venus we see the process involving the kidneys and bladder and
this also is a tone process. The Moon itself involves growth and
reproduction, which again is a watery process involving tone. I would have
to say that we don’t really encounter the densest ether-the life ether-until
we come to the carbon based life activity we see in the soil food web and
the carbon based life forms its supports here on earth. And yet, there is a
further refinement and concentration of ether in metal, which we see as
aluminium in the clay (clay is aluminium silicate) or in the
iron/nickel/etc. magnetic core of the earth or in the gold innermost core of
the earth, and this draws etheric force into the soil from the warmth and
light and also the tone into the soil and ultimately into the interior of
the earth. This means that the richly condensed processes we see in the
inner planets of Mercury, Venus and the Moon are a back-wash or reflection
of the stream that flows through the earth as warmth and light on its way
toward the sun.

Let’s consider for a moment what it means for a process to be dynamic. The
word dynamic implies change, fluctuation or oscillation. Think of this as
cyclical. Living organisms indisputably run up. They grow. But they also run
down. If they did not they would grow on and on to endless infinity and
beyond, and a single living organism would consume the entire universe and
more besides. So far as we are aware this does not happen. Instead life and
living organisms pulse, they breathe, they expand and contract, reach and
withdraw, grow, mature and senesce. Life arises as the tiniest spark and
runs up like a forest afire, but then it also runs down and rejoins the
ocean of chaos from which it arose.

The sun is by far the most immense, densest, most concentrated being in our
near vicinity. All the etheric flow lines converge on the sun. But the sun
itself is alive in the fullest sense insofar as it both runs up and it runs
down. Warmth and light are insubstantial as warmth is purely a wave form, an
excitation in the ether, and light-though it is associated with particles
known as photons-also has no measurable mass, or at least its mass is
infinitesimal. These ethers converge on the sun and condense in the first
place into hydrogen and from there go on to form more and more substantial
elements from helium, lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon and beyond. These
physical particles-hydrogen is the basis of tone and carbon the basis of
life-are given off by the sun as bound ether in the stream of ionic
particles coming to us from the sun and passing through the vortices of
Mercury, Venus and the Moon. Although the Moon sweeps these up and lays them
down upon the earth, it is moisture that carries them into the earth and
gives them over into the growth processes of living organisms. This is the
downward etheric process, but do not forget the etheric processes of warmth
and light that stream in from beyond Saturn are flowing upward from the
earth toward the sun, and it is only what the sun has condensed and given
off again on the return flow via Mercury, Venus and the Moon that we see as
‘fertiliser’ that works downward into the earth.

However, when the Moon is full, warmth and light-also a part of the Sun’s
reflection-are at their fullest, and this means that the tone and life
forces the moon has deposited are brought back upward into the growth of
plants (by warmth and light) more strongly than at any other time of the
moon.

Originally the question was ‘When to Fertilise?’. Well, I suppose this is a
value judgment that depends on what sort of result you are looking for. It
might be more to the point to ask ‘How to Fertilise?’.
Anyway, enough for now.

Best wishes,

Hugh Lovel

Hugh’s best article ever on Biochemical Sequence and Plant Growth

The Biochemical Sequence

 

© 2014 by Hugh Lovel

 

What is the hierarchy or ‘biochemical sequence’ of what must function first before the next thing and the next thing works. The elements early in this sequence must be present and working well before later elements have any chance of being useful for plant growth. Nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium occur late in this biochemical sequence, while sulphur, boron, silicon and calcium start things off.

 

0 Sulphur: Sulphur interacts with life chemistry (carbon-hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen compounds) at surfaces. Along with warmth, it is the principle catalyst in biochemistry. Since everything going on in the soil biology occurs at the surfaces of soil particles where minerals react with water, air and warmth, sulphur activates surfaces—is the essential ‘key-in-the-ignition’ for kicking off robust soil biochemistry. In his Agriculture Course, Steiner speaks of how ‘the spirit-activity of the universe works as a sculptor, moistening its fingers with sulphur . . .’ [1]

Along with warmth, it is the classic catalyst of carbon chemistry.

 

Biochemical Sequence 3_3

Sulphur works at the surfaces, boundaries and edges of things to bring organization and life into being. Regardless of other soluble elements, the soluble soil test for sulphur should show 50 ppm sulphur [Morgan test] for biological soil fertility to function properly. Light soils may need a bit less and heavy soils may need more. In the total test a 60 to 1 carbon to sulphur ratio is helpful to ensure enough sulphur in soil reserves.

 

Silicon forms the basis for the capillary action that takes up nutrients from the soil. Fortunately for agriculture, silicon’s activity defies gravity. But to do this silica relies on boron, a component of clay. In his second agricultural lecture Steiner insightfully asserts, “First we need to know what is really going on. However else clay may be described, however else we must treat it so that it becomes fertile—all this is of secondary importance; the primary thing we need to know is that clay promotes the upward stream of the cosmic factor.”[2]

 

1 Boron: It is the boron component in clay that is the accelerator pedal of agriculture, while silicon forms the highway that carries nutrients throughout plants and animals. Boron interacts with silica in the linings of transport vessels and stimulates the flow of nutrients along the silicon highway. This places boron first in the biochemical sequence, and if either boron or silicon is deficient the soil biology will function below its potential. With either boron or silicon deficiency—and especially with both—crops will wilt instead of growing on hot days. Ironically, the two most effective ways to create boron and silicon deficiency are: 

 

1. Clean cultivation  

2. Use of artificial nitrogen fertilisers 

 

Though standard in modern agriculture, these practices make boron and silica available by killing off the soil biology that builds and maintains the soil’s clay/humus complexes. This releases a flush of boron and silicon which can easily drain way through the landscape.

 

2  Silicon: Of course, sap pressure would be no use without a transport system to contain it, and silicon provides the actual transport of nutrients. Interestingly, applying too much boron too early in a crop cycle is notable for burning seedlings and young transplants-such as sprouting squash, beans or tomatoes-because too much sap pressure in such a tiny plant drives sodium out the leaf margins. Nevertheless, in plants where leaf veins are highly branched, like peas, beans, squash and tomatoes, boron is important in later growth to maintain strong enough sap pressure to make such a complex system work.

On the other hand, highly siliceous plants, such as grasses, do well on less boron to give them sap pressure since their transport vessels all run parallel without branching. That’s like irrigation lines that only feed one sprinkler head. Such a thing doesn’t take much pressure.

Obviously without robust transport, nowhere near as much nutrient reaches the leaves or is stored in the fruits. Chemical agriculture gets around this to some extent, since-even with a weak transport system-anything that is highly soluble, such as potassium nitrate, is simply taken up along with water. Though this dilutes the sap, it flows quite easily due to low sap density. This is why chemically grown foods commonly have coarse, watery cell structure, as well as lower nutrition and poorer keeping quality. However, without a robust transport system, heavier, less-soluble nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, carbohydrate-and-amino-acid complexes can easily be left behind.

 

3  Calcium, which comes next in the sequence, is the truck that travels on the highway. Along with magnesium, potassium and sodium calcium forms the lime complex traffic that dominates the reactive side of life chemistry.

Where silicon, along with carbon forms the weakly-reactive nutrient highway, calcium, along with oxygen, forms the strongly reactive cargo that flows down the silica transport and containment system. Calcium and the lime complex is the last thing you want to leave behind because of its role in nitrogen fixation and amino acid chemistry. Calcium balances charge in proteins and is particularly important in cell division, which is the first thing that happens in fruit or seed formation after pollination. Without it there would be no fruit or seed. It collects and carries with it the nutrients that follow in the biochemical sequence.

As the opposite polarity of plant chemistry from the free-handed silicon, calcium is hungry, even greedy. This is why it needs the aloof silica to line the transport system. Above all else, calcium engages nitrogen to make amino acids, the basis of DNA, RNA and proteins. In turn, these nitrogen compounds are responsible for the complex enzyme and hormone chemistry of life which employs everything from sulphur and silicon to magnesium, iron, phosphorous, zinc, manganese copper and other trace elements. Probably the most important point is, nitrogen provides the amino acids in chlorophyll, which is key to photosynthesis, a highly efficient means of catching energy.

For example, taking corn, Zea maize, if calcium does not reach the ear in sufficient quantities, the kernels near the end of the ear simply do not fill out. With a crop like soybeans Glycene max, double or even triple the calcium values of maize are needed for full pod set without shedding pods-a common problem in soybeans. Wouldn’t you like to see every kernel on your maize fill out to the end of the ear and every soybean blossom produce a full pod of beans? This only happens when boron, silicon and the calcium lime complex work together well.

 

4 Nitrogen: As just mentioned, wherever calcium goes there also goes nitrogen. And nitrogen is the basis of amino acid formation, protein chemistry and DNA replication and expression. Once nitrogen enters the picture all sorts of proteins, enzymes and hormones are produced and very complex things are set in motion involving trace elements.

Unfortunately, soluble nitrogen fertilisers only stimulate this latter portion of the sequence without addressing the priorities of sulphur, boron, silicon and calcium. Such fertilisers stimulate growth, but they are like methamphetamine. They grow weak crops that depend on growing in weedy conditions where they fall prey to pests and diseases. 

All parts of a plant’s protein chemistry require amino acid nitrogen. Nitrogen straddles the divide between the chemically indifferent silicon and the calcium large amounts of amino acids go into the formation of chlorophyll where energy is gathered. After all, gathering and sequestering energy is essential to life. Without photosynthesis plants would never grow. This is where magnesium, phosphorous, potassium and a wide range of micronutrients follow nitrogen in the biochemical sequence.

 

5 Magnesium: Since photosynthesis requires magnesium, it is fifth in the biochemical sequence, ahead of all the more minor trace elements.

Of course, photosynthesis is not simply a matter of chlorophyll catching energy. The energy has to be transferred from the chlorophyll to the silicon into producing sugars out of carbon dioxide and water, which requires phosphorous for energy transfer. Otherwise the chlorophyll burns up, and the leaves turn a wine red colour.

However, as long as there is enough phosphorous, carbon is pried loose from carbon dioxide so it can combine with water to make sugar and release oxygen.

 

6  Phosphorous: Of course, photosynthesis is not simply a matter of chlorophyll catching energy. The energy has to be transferred into producing sugars out of carbon dioxide and water, which requires phosphorous for energy transfer. Otherwise the chlorophyll burns up, and the leaves turn a wine red colour.

 

7  Carbon: As long as there is enough phosphorous, carbon is engaged as carbon dioxide and the energy transferred from chlorophyll via phosphorous to combines carbon dioxide with water, making sugar and releasing oxygen.

 

8 Potassium: At this point the sugars pass into the plant’s sap where potassium, the electrolyte, guides them to wherever they most need to go.

 

Yes, Oversimplified

 

Understandably, this sequence is oversimplified. For example, sulphur is the classic catalyst in carbon (organic) chemistry. Without it, nothing-not even the boron-would give rise to life. Also, potassium has a very close relationship with silicon, so when silicon carries calcium and amino acids to the cell division sites in the plant, potassium plays the role of an electronic doorway that lets the calcium and amino acids enter the cells that are preparing to divide. If cold weather slows potassium down, or if it is in short supply, then calcium and amino acids cannot reach the cell nuclei, the DNA cannot divide, cell division fails and the fruit falls off the plant.  Sometimes entire fruit crops are lost to a couple degrees of frost when a light spray of kelp with potassium silicate would save the day.

 

Supplementation with Minerals and Rock Powders

 

Even though quantum agriculture is primarily about organization and biological activities, soil mineralization must be considered. How does one organise something if it isn’t there? Many soils need gypsum or elemental sulphur because they are sulphur deficient in both their soluble and total tests. Many soils also need silicon rock powders—also a source of boron. This is true if past nitrogen fertilisation has flushed whatever boron and silicon was there away. Boron and silicon deficiencies also occur following overgrazing or clean cultivation. Silicon availability may need to be fostered to get the soil biology up and running so it can release more silicon from the surfaces of soil particles. The soil’s silicon biology is easily depleted by nitrogen fertilization, overgrazing or clean cultivation.

Through lack of experience and understanding, many ‘organic’ farms use raw manures—the worst being chicken manure—as a nitrogen source. This soon depletes sulphur, boron and silicon. The remedy for this is likely to be compost made by adding 10% or so of high silicon rock powders along with a little gypsum to composts and composting fully with soil until it looks and smells like soil.

In addition to gypsum and high silica rock powders, lime can be used to provide calcium. Dolomite also provides magnesium if this is needed. Rock phosphorous provides silicon, calcium and phosphorus. There are also natural potassium sulphate ores. Rock powders tend to also provide a variety of trace elements. For high pH soils with large excesses of sodium and potassium the remedy in drier climates may be increasing the soil’s holding capacity with humates and zeolite to buffer pH and build more storage.

 

What’s the Aim?

 

Most importantly, the biochemical sequence shows us we need to start with sulphur to expose the surfaces of soil particles to biological activity so reserves can kick in. Other methods may not recognize sulphur’s key importance, but in quantum agriculture this should be clear. And where budgets are slim and long range soil fertility is desired boron, silicon and calcium follow sulphur in importance.

Unfortunately for nutrition, health and long term vitality of the soil’s biochemistry, soluble NPK fertilisers continue to be used for their ability to gloss over deficiencies of sulphur, boron, silicon and calcium. Large reserves of nitrogen, as well as phosphorous and potassium, are commonly present—even if inactive—at the surfaces of soil particles where the organization of life chemistry arises. Only when the biochemistry of sulphur, boron, silicon and calcium is thriving can the potential of these reserves become available.

This all goes back to Liebig’s ‘law of the minimum’ which says plants can only perform as well as their most deficient nutrients.

 

 



[1] Agriculture, Rudolf Steiner, Creeger-Gardner translation, pp 44-47.

[2] Agriculture, Rudolf Steiner, Creeger-Gardner translation, page 31.

 

RAIN, RAIN, RAIN

“A living organism has the astonishing gift of concentrating a ‘stream of order’ on itself, thus escaping the decay into atomic chaos.” –Erwin Schrödinger

            “It is the anomalies in nature that reveal the principles of life.” –Goethe

 

Rain, Rain, Rain; Enriching the Atmosphere By Hugh Lovel

 

            My experience over the last 30 years shows it is possible to restore order to the atmosphere, a pre-requisite for rain. This could be an important part of returning farmers to self-sufficiency, and the methods— biodynamic sequential spraying, and/or radionic treatments with biodynamic reagents in combinations with color, sound and intents—are cheap and within the ability of most farmers to accomplish with relatively simple equipment. Only the know-how is lacking.

            Weather is always changing, though it follows a pattern that oscillates back and forth within limits. Whenever it gets too hot and/or too dry it self-corrects to become cooler or wetter or both. However, this oscillation has obscure trigger points. MIT mathematician Edward Lorentz made this discovery in the mid ‘50s, giving rise to Chaos Theory. Chaos is a fact, but theory seeks to explain how it gives rise to order. Water evaporates, chaotically into the atmosphere. What makes it concentrate in clouds so dense they drop rain in certain places and at certain times—but not others?

 

The Stewardship of Rain

 

Often there is plenty of moisture in the air but no rain. Particularly in the southeastern USA the humidity can be 95% along with 95℉ without a cloud in the sky. In such conditions I can’t seem to draw much vitality from the atmosphere because it has so little. It is significantly worse in urban areas such as Atlanta, Georgia where summer thundershowers move across from western Douglas County, break up, go around urban Fulton and DeKalb counties, and resume their rain pattern in eastern Rockdale County. The traffic and industrial fumes that repel moisture and fuel the urban haze only abate on the weekends where weather statistics show 20% greater chances of rain on the family barbecue than on the weekday commute. What are we doing?

Global weather is a complicated self-correcting system. There is debate about the causes of global warming, but one thing is certain—global temperatures have risen. Polar icecaps show accelerated melting, especially in the northern hemisphere, and many glaciers world-wide are disappearing. Most importantly the temperatures of equatorial oceans show gains of roughly half a degree Celsius over the last 50 or so years, and heat drives the world’s weather because evaporation from the equatorial oceans puts the moisture into the atmosphere that fuels storms. 

Roughly 89.5 billion acres of the earth’s surface is covered by water, and an acre-inch of water is 193,460 gallons. This means if evaporation was constant at merely an inch a year, rather than an inch or so a month, this would amount to 17.3 quadrillion gallons of water per year. That is 17.3 million billion gallons of water. Even a slight rise in the temperature of equatorial oceans means millions upon millions more gallons of water rise into the atmosphere. No one is sure exactly how much, but it all has to fall somewhere. Wherever moderate rainfall becomes scarcer and scarcer because ground cover is lost or pollution increases, floods become more common a few hundred miles away. Droughts in Chad, Sudan and Somalia correspond with floods in Mozambique and Tanzania. Droughts in Siberia are related to floods in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Alternatively, droughts in the Indus and Ganges watersheds produce floods along the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers. Drought in North America is accompanied by floods from the UK to Russia. If we reversed the conditions that lead to drought—such as bare soil and pollution—we would restore order to the atmosphere and return to normal rainfall while preventing floods. This would be an act of environmental responsibility.

 

Background

 

            As earth and sky interact, we cannot revitalize the atmosphere without revitalizing the soil—in which case we should consider how wrongly most soils are fertilized. According to Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary a fertilizer is any substance that when applied to the soil makes it more fertile. However, the Fertilizer Institute and the industries behind them have secured the passage of laws requiring fertilizers to be soluble. Though the industry’s agenda is transparent, good sense says we don’t want our nutrients to be soluble, we want them to be insoluble but available—which is what occurs when the nutrients are stored and retained by the life of the soil. Then, by the teeming symbiosis characteristic of healthy soil, sufficient nutrients for robust crop production will be steadily available and the soil will be truly fertile.

Under present laws lime and other rock dusts must be advertised as soil amendments rather than fertilizers. Balanced, well-humified compost, which is even more crucial to building soil fertility, also is classified as an amendment rather than a fertilizer, as most of its nutrients are insoluble though available. On the other hand the massive use of soluble nitrogen ‘fertilizers’ such as anhydrous ammonia, urea or nitrates is like intoxicating oneself on a diet of amphetamines and ignoring healthy, balanced nutrition. Then everything goes like the clappers—until at some point it doesn’t go very well at all. Resting strong soils may return them to productivity, but eventually the collapse will be fatal if irresponsible soil practices don’t change. Obviously building soil biology and eliminating reliance on poisons would help the atmosphere immeasurably. There is a science to this. It can be done, but given the inertia of the present system it won’t be done soon. It may take massive losses in the agricultural sector for these changes to occur. In the interim what can we—who want to protect ourselves and moderate the damage—do?

 

Sequential Spraying

 

            In the late 80s Hugh Courtney of the Josephine Porter Institute in Woolwine, VAwas experimenting with applying the entire array of biodynamic preparations in close conjunction with each other. At a biodynamic conference on my farm we followed a sequence of evening barrel compound (BC), morning horsetail decoction (BD 508), evening horn manure (BD 500) and morning horn silica (BD 501), —thus applying all the preps Rudolf Steiner introduced in his Agriculture Course over a two day period. Courtney called it an energy balancing procedure, which he tested on his farm in Woolwine, Virginia and introduced at workshops in various parts of the country.

            Hugh Courtney also suggested following up the prep sequence with milk and honey. Having a land flowing with milk and honeyis a Biblical idea that implies a countryside rich in nourishment for the whole human being, both physically and spiritually. Since milk is related to calcium and the soil, the milk potency should be sprayed in the evening on the soil. As for honey, it is related to the silica activities of the daytime and should be sprayed in the air in the morning.

 

Further Experiments

 

            During the late 80s, 90s and early 00s there were repeated summer droughts in the American Southeast, but wherever this sequence was employed at least technical precipitation if not outright rain followed within 72 hours. Hugh Courtney explained this as the ability of the BD preps to attract whatever was needed, and his experiments indicated that best success with making rain was likely if the sequence began in a water constellation and was completed just prior to full moon when watery forces were strongest.

            Early on in the development of this procedure I started using radionics as an application of the axiom of fluid dynamics—often called the butterfly effect—that a microscopic change at a point can effect large scale changes in the medium. With an aerial map of my farm as my witness, I used my double-dial Hieronymus variable capacitance instrument with vials of the various preps as reagents along with double-dial rates that I obtained by cold scanning. I alternated applications while I fixed supper with applications when I fixed breakfast, dowsing for the duration of each application and using a timer in the circuit that would shut off the instrument while I was out at work on the farm or elsewhere. For the most part I was successful in getting timely rainfall even when the rest of Georgia was experiencing drought. On challenging occasions I learned to use color beamed into the instrument’s witness well,  along with herbal and mineral reagents, and I even used pictures and played recordings of rain—and whale songs, such exuberance!—along with my radionic programs. I became so confident of getting rain when I needed it that I gave my irrigation equipment away.

            I also learned to use Malcolm Rae type equipment with cards for the biodynamic preparation patterns along with an interrupter in the circuit that turned the instrument on and off hundreds of times a minute to create the effect of myriad butterflys flapping their infinitessimal corrections rather than creating a single one off event. In 2005 I purchased a Power Radionic program for my computer from a dealer in HSCTI products in Woodstock, Georgia, ( http://www.hscti.net/index.html ) and with that I ran radionic programs on my computer—which opened up even further options.

            In November, 2011 my wife, Shabari, and I flew in from Australia for the Weston A. Price convention in Dallas, TX and were shocked to see the devastation of the previous 10 months of drought. We organised a series of workshops in the Austin area focusing on sequential spraying and within the week most of the participants were rewarded by rain. But we know how much enthusiasm and diligence it takes to keep something like this going, and how easy it can be to lose confidence in the beginning. The tricks of the trade are myriad, and we share many of these on our RAIN CD, available from our website at www.quantumagriculture.com . We expect to be at the ACRES Convention in December.

             

                       

            Hugh Lovel and his wife, Shabari Bird Lovel live in Australia though they spend their northern winter months in Blairsville, Georgia where they hold a six day advanced course in Quantum Agriculture in early February. Shabari can be contacted at shabaribird@gmail.com and Hugh at hugh.lovel9@bigpond.com .

 

*****

 

Sidebar One:

 

Sequential Spraying—adapted from Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993).

 

In advance of each stirring draw 3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon bucket. If the water is chlorinated, leave overnight or stir for 30 minutes to outgas as much of the chlorine as possible. The water ideally should be warm, i.e. in the vicinity of 65 – 72℉. It may be warmed with sunlight, wood or gas, though electricity is not so ideal.

1st Evening: Barrel Compound (BC)—The first afternoon, add a one acre unit of barrel compound (⅓ cup) to three gallons of water and stir as below for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

Stirring: With arm or stirring stick, stir round and round to create a strong vortex. The water will become organized into laminar layers so that the cooler, denser layers move to the middle and sink while the warmer layers seek the edges and rise. The appearance is one of a spinning funnel and the water is organized. At this point reverse the direction of stirring. The water will churn and froth in chaos until a new vortex organizes. Once the new vortex is mature the direction is reversed again, and again, back and forth, 20 minutes each for BC and 508 and 1 hour each for 500 and 501. Every time a new vortex is established a new generation of organization is created. Organization is the basis of life, as living organisms are organized. By creating generation after generation of order, an evolution of order results. This charges up the remedy with life force while imparting the intentions and vibrations of the stirrer to the water. Then what one thinks, one grows.

Spraying: This spray should soak into the soil, much as does the dew, and should be sprinkled in the late afternoon in large droplets. Each drop radiates up to 6 feet, so there is no need for uniform coverage. Since life force flows from lower to higher concentration, spraying in this fashion will draw life force from the surrounding cosmos to the location sprayed. A pail and a wallpaper brush or whiskbroom is sufficient for applying this remedy.

1st Morning: Horsetail Decoction (508)—Prior to stirring, make a decoction, which is a brew simmered for 20 minutes, from 8 ounces of dried horsetail herb in ¾ gallon of water. In the early morning, dilute the pre-made decoction to 3 gallons with warm water and stir as above for 20 minutes. Apply this preparation to evaporate upward.

1st Evening: Horn Manure (500)—Add a one acre unit (¼ cup) of horn manure to three gallons of warm water and stir for 1 hour. Spray on the soil in large droplets.

2nd Morning: Horn Silica (501)— Add a one acre unit of horn silica (1 gram) to three gallons of water and stir as before for an hour. In summer, spray this remedy as a mist so it radiates upward into the lower atmosphere as a fine mist over the leaf canopy, perhaps chest or head high in the early morning. It may settle before evaporating, which is good. In winter, when warmth and light have receded into the earth, this should be misted directly onto the soil.

3rd Evening: Milk—In the evening, dilute a pint of milk in 3 gallons of warm water and stir for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

3rd Morning: Honey—In the early morning, dilute an ounce of honey in 3 gallons of water and stir for 20 minutes. Apply as a fine mist that evaporates upward.

4th Evening: Repeat Sequence from beginning starting with barrel compost.

 

Biodynamic preparations can be obtained at a modest cost from The Josephine Porter Institute (JPI), P. O. Box 133, Woolwine, Virginia 24185-0133. Tel: (276)930 – 2463 (Mon-Fri 8am-5pm). www.jpibiodynamics.org/

 

*****

 

Sidebar Two:

 

El Niño/La Niña

 

            The Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest driver of evaporation and weather. Scientists have long studied something called the Southern Oscillation or the irregular but periodic shift of tropical warmth between the western Pacific and eastern Pacific Oceans.

            With an El Niño the eastern Pacific Ocean becomes noticeably warmer off the coast of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, generally around Christmas. The resulting evaporation of moisture rises into the upper atmosphere, accelerated by the Andes Mountains. This charges up the upper atmosphere with moisture which tends to shift precipitation toward the polar latitudes. This generally means droughts for large parts of the world. However, this can only go on so long before evaporation brings in cold currents in the lower ocean to replenish what evaporated. This cools off the El Niño cycle and shifts the balance of warmth back toward the western Pacific.

            La Niña, on the other hand, is a condition of elevated warmth in the western Pacific where there is no wall of high mountains. This sends moisture up into the lower atmosphere driving monsoons.

            Until the age of Chaos Theory the trend in science was to study things by reducing them to extreme simplicity. Scientists struggling to use a systems approach that included as many variables as possible were relegated to the fringes and sometimes ridiculed. However, with weather—as with agriculture—single factor analysis is the apex of absurdity. Fortunately the age of computing has provided the tools for modeling complex systems involving many variables.

            Taken as a whole, our stable global weather cycles have been going on since the dawn of history, fed and driven by warmth and other organizational factors—though recent global warming seems to have raised our weather intensity a bit. From a longer perspective, however, the world has alternated between long glacial periods and brief inter-glacials, and the tipping points are obscure. There seem to have been periods, occasionally, where the poles melted and ocean levels were considerably higher. Presently we seem on the cusp of change, but whether that will be to a warmer cycle or an ice age is uncertain.

            Chaos theory scientists acknowledge the obscurity of organizational factors by giving them such names as the “strange attractor” and the “butterfly effect”. Modeling organizational factors has been a challenge, especially for scientists who previously believed everything simply degenerated into chaos. How to describe the rise of order out of chaos?

            At least we can study warmth. Obviously the earth is warmest around the equator and coolest near the poles. This means the atmosphere heats up and expands near the equator and shrinks at the poles, which is what drives weather. Around the equator the portion of the earth’s atmosphere where weather occurs—known as the troposphere—is roughly 10 miles deep, while near the poles it is only about 5 miles deep. This means that air warms and rises around the equator, and as it cools it slides off on a downhill path known as a thermocline towards the poles where it funnels down one or the other polar vortex driving winter storms. The stronger the evaporation around the equator the more strongly this drives winter storms—and the occurrence of more powerful winter storms is one of the signs of global warming.

            The oceans do something similar with the Gulf Stream and the Japan Current sliding down thermoclines toward Norway and Alaska. However, the melting of the northern polar icecap may shut down the Gulf Stream’s thermocline, which has weather scientists wondering whether that means a new ice age for northern Europe and Siberia. Could global warming be the trigger for an ice age? Alas, there are many unknowns, but most notably, the oscillation of surface temperatures between the eastern and western Pacific has a pronounced effect on evaporation and thus on rainfall, with the tilt of the earth’s axis as a major factor in causing oscillations. The fact that Pacific warming trends are strongest around Christmas when the sun is furthest south earns this cycle the title of the Southern Oscillation.

            As stated previously, the periodic effect of the Southern Oscillation is irregular, and the key to its better management would be identifying and understanding such organizational factors as the strange attractor and the butterfly effect. Familiarity with the biodynamic preparations as organizational factors used in agriculture is a logical starting point for such research.

 

*****

 

Sidebar Three:

 

From Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993). –By Hugh Courtney

     First of all, the sequential spraying technique was developed by myself, almost accidentally, in the early summer of 1988 when it appeared that we were about to face a third year of blistering drought. Frustrated by that possibility, I reasoned that surely there had to be something in biodynamic agriculture that could relieve or at least ameliorate the damage to our pastures, hayfields and gardens, after all, had not Steiner himself in the Agriculture course, (see Lecture #5, especially page 89), suggested that the preparations could help the plant attract to itself from its environment what was needed for its best growth? I thought surely, if one knew precisely what preparations to use, then relief should be available somehow. That is if one assumes that biodynamics really is valid and truly works. In my case, however, I did not have the wisdom to know the precise preparation to use.

    At this point in my work with the preparations, I was convinced that it would be fairly difficult to cause harm with them, even if one used them in a situation that did not seem appropriate.
The worst thing in such a case would be that their effects could be reduced or negligible. So, I chose to use all nine of them. The six compost preparations were applied in the form of Barrel Compost (Thun recipe) along with BD #500, BD #501, and BD #508. I reasoned that I should commence in the evening with Barrel Compost, since the generally accepted biodynamic practice is to begin with the compost preparations. I followed the next morning with BD #508, and since I had been very much impressed with the work of Lilly Kolisko, and since I already had some on hand, I chose to use the fermented version of BD #508 as detailed in her work, Agriculture of Tomorrow. In the evening of the second day I applied the BD #500. On the morning of the third day, I sprayed the BD #501(c) which is a crystal silica material found in a matrix of rectorite, a clay-like substance. I had been experimenting with this form of #501 and had been very pleased with the results to this point, so it was an obvious choice for me.
    Since I was treating hayfields, and was very interested in the water element anyway, I chose to apply the sequence in a leaf period, which turned out to be just before the full moon,  on the 26th, 27th and 28th of June 1988. Sometime within the following night, we received a nice, lengthy , soaking rain which totaled around .9 of an inch.

 

           

 

 

 

Dynamic Processes

Dynamic Processes

by Hugh Lovel

 

In the uptake of nutrients from the soil foodweb, sulphur is the catalyst for nutrient release. Ever at work at the surfaces of things, sulphur, as sulphate, infiltrates the interstices between the soil’s colloidal particles and exposes their surfaces. In short, sulphur is the ‘open sesame’ to the soil’s mineral storehouse.

Silicon follows, and forms a partnership with the sulphur containing amino acids, methionine, cysteine and cystine in the structure of cell walls and connective tissues. In fibrous tissues, particularly in plant stems, this includes the linings of capillary vessels, as these do double duty as connective tissues, as in the stems of fruits.   

Boron, as borate, embeds itself in these silica linings and establishes an unresolved electron bond in the surrounding silica network that draws water and nutrients into the plant. As a result calcium, magnesium, potassium and amino acids are taken up from the soil and delivered to cell division and chlorophyll rich sites in growing tips and leaves. As chlorophyll captures light waves, phosphorous transfers this energy into sugar production—after which a mix of sugars and carbohydrates follow potassium through the silica pathways to store or provide energy wherever required in the plant.

This also means the role of silica, allied with boron, has enormous importance for photosynthesis.. The rapid transportation system of C4 grasses makes them the most photo-efficient plants—as they can really move things. Through their silica transport system they transfer the energy from chlorophyll to sugar faster than other plants. And abundant photosynthesis depends on how fast the reactions occur. The previous energy catching event must move out of the way for the next one to occur.

It might seem this would happen at the speed of light. In the leaf, however, the magnesium/chlorophyll complex that catches light is stationary. It has to send the energy it captures via phosphorous to where sugar is made, and the speed it transports this energy boosted phosphorous chemistry determines the rate of photosynthesis. C4 grasses are also most efficient at moving carbon dioxide and water into the process while speedily getting sugar out of the way so there are no bottlenecks. This is why with grasses like sugar cane, maize or sorghum, brix readings may need to be taken from the bases of leaves or stems rather than from leaf panels, as these plants rapidly move sugars away from where they are made. 

In looking at this picture, we want to be aware that the sulphur containing amino acids associated with silicon work very differently from nitrates, which cannot be excluded from plant water uptake. High levels of nitrates upset this process. While there will always be some nitrate uptake from the oxidation of amino acids within the soil, excess nitrate is closely associated with low brix. Brix is a measure of dissolved solids; and carbohydrates normally account for roughly nine tenths of the dissolved solids in plant sap.

If the plant can’t exclude nitrates, it must convert them to amino acids or they are useless—even toxic. If anything, nitrate’s affinity for water dilutes plant sap, protoplasm and chlorophyll, impairing photosynthesis and compromising plant vitality.

The conversion of nitrate to amino acid takes time and nearly the same energy as it took to fix nitrogen biologically. This means if plants use up their sugars plant converting nitrate to amino acids, this limits what is left over for root exudation and microbial nitrogen fixation around plant roots.

If nitrate uptake is too abundant or the plant’s conversion is too slow, its protoplasm stays watered down and nitrate reduction lags. Excess nitrate may even scald the plant’s silica transport system resulting in a low brix plant that is difficult to boost.

 

Winter Builds Complexity Into Soils.

 

As winter begins, photosynthesis slows down and nitrogen fixation becomes more problematical, while what grew in summer digests back into the soil. This process builds complexity. We can contribute or impede this, and sometimes we do—perhaps unwittingly, or perhaps deliberately. We have to learn what’s best. What emerges is it is particularly important that decomposing proteins are incorporated into humic acids and built into soil organic matter for future reference—along with sulphates, phosphates, borates and various major and minor nutrients.

Come spring, this complexity will start to break down and release a complex nutrient stream to feed plant growth. If one uses nitrate rich fertilisers—including organic ones—the importance of low nitrates and high amino acids in the root zone will show up in reduced vigour and crop quality.

Brix testing in the middle of crop cycles and trying to rescue processes that were less than optimum during winter, is no substitute for preparing over the previous winter to achieve high brix throughout the crop cycle. For many growers taking the appropriate steps in winter might see a welcome change from crops losing their oomph after the summer solstice when the days start getting shorter and sap doesn’t flow quite as strongly as it should.

 This returns to the question of the importance of strong sap flow.

Plants readily take up amino acid nitrogen, unless nitrates get in the way. Plants are healthiest getting most of their nitrogen as amino acids from the interface between their roots and the soil food web, rather than taking up nitrates in their water. But either way they must get nitrogen. The limiting factor in amino acid uptake usually is root exudation, which supplies energy to nitrogen fixing microbes. These microbes require abundant energy to manufacture amino acids. And lest we forget, soil animal life, particularly protozoa, must digest the nitrogen fixing microbes and release amino acids if this process is to support robust growth. 

If boron is sufficient and the uptake of water and nutrients from the soil is strong, photosynthesis will be productive, and in turn root exudates will be abundant. Otherwise nitrogen fixation may slow down and stall. One of the worries is that nitrate uptake reacts with boron. Thus it can flush boron out of the capillary linings and reduce sap pressure, nutrient uptake and root exudation.

 

Efficiency

 

Advocates of chemical nitrogen say fertilising with artificial nitrogen is efficient because plants don’t have to supply the energy. They reason that if artificial fixation uses ten units of methane to make one unit of ammonia, and still more to convert this into other forms, this is carbon energy the plant does not have to supply. However, when artificial nitrogen is applied as urea, half volatilizes as N2O gas while the remainder oxidizes to nitrate. Moreover, plants use up nearly as much energy converting nitrate to amino acid as was required to fix nitrogen as amino acid in the first place, so where is the savings?

The clincher is that nitrate suppresses nitrogen fixation—nitrogen fixing microbes drown in their own waste, as nitrate is the final waste product of their activity. This means that artificial nitrogen fertilisation—even if from organic sources—shuts down biological fixation. Then plants must depend on applied nitrates rather than on feeding nitrogen fixation and receiving amino acid uptake.

Ironically, the methane required for artificial nitrogen fixation is a non-renewable resource. We don’t want to become dependent on its use to artificially produce nitrogen because whenever it becomes scarce we’ll be in a fix.

In a low nitrate soil, microbes living around plant roots depend on strong sap flow, rich in amino acids and low in nitrates, into the plant by day. In return the plant gives off energy rich root exudates by night. With plenty of energy to fix nitrogen, the nitrogen fixing microbes and the protozoa which digest them in the soil foodweb will provide ample amino acids in each new day’s sap uptake. Strong sap uptake assures rich photosynthesis which assures more energy given off as root exudates. Then there is increased nitrogen fixation and protozoal digestion the following evening. This feeds richer amino acid uptake, stronger photosynthesis, more root exudation and so forth.

The less plants take up nitrate and the more they take up amino acids, the more efficiently they photosynthesise and share their life energy with their microbial symbiotes in the soil; then the more complex and vigorous they tend to be. In the final analysis, it not only matters how we build life processes into our soil, but also whether we impart these in an appropriate, balanced way. There are up and down processes. What goes on above adds energy and complexity to the growth and foliar processes which supply root exudates. Then if what goes on in the soil goes up, then what goes on in the leaf goes back down as root exudates.

Nitrogen comes into these processes in the soil, while carbon enters via the leaf. So we must see to the activities of sulphur, boron and silicon that open up the soil and provide transport for calcium, amino acids, magnesium, phosphorus, etc. so they arrive in the leaf and the processes of turning water and carbon dioxide into sugar take place.

The dynamic is that a certain amount of sugar is required to provide the energy for initiating microbial release of sulphur, boron and silicon for plants to deliver nutrients to the leaves. This is why crop seeds have large, carbohydrate rich cotyledons while weeds have tiny seeds with next to no carbohydrates. Conversely the amino acids and minerals delivered from the soils are required for the leaves to capture energy and make carbohydrates in the leaves. This delivers carbohydrates to the soil’s microbes as root exudates and feeds more and more nitrogen fixation. The dynamic interplay between what goes on below ground and what goes on above depends on boosting each  activity at the right times, morning and evening—as if we were pumping our farms or garden up on a swing set. Timing and balance are key, and that means there’s no substitute for doing the right thing at the right time. We need rhythm and feeling as well as a modicum of substance.

It becomes clearer and clearer that we cannot meet all our challenges in agriculture without understanding both processes and substances. Substances play their parts, but we need an understanding of life process as well. These differ with the seasons, the phases of the moon and various other factors. Without doing the right things at the right times we will never turn our farms around to improving instead of running down. Ultimately what this means is operating our farms or gardens as unique organisms within their own boundaries and contexts. These can be the property boundaries and natural cycles, within which energy and complexity builds up out of the surroundings; but, without boundaries and closure of cycles,  life forces leak away.

Definition of Biodynamics

WHAT IS BIODYNAMIC AGRICULTURE?

 

BIODYNAMIC AXGRICULTURE:  Bio (life) dynamic (processes); Biodynamic agriculture involves working with life processes.

This does not mean physical substance or chemistry are ignored. The biodynamic approach to agriculture emphasizes life processes which have potent organisational (syntropic) effects to engage minerals and chemical reactions. The use of what are called ‘biodynamic preparations’ establishes, increases and enhances life processes. The question is, what is a LIFE process and what are the life processes we are talking about?

Nineteenth and twentieth century physics focused on life-LESS processes. With these energy flowed from higher concentration to lower concentration, as without life all energy flows from order toward chaos in a process called entropy. However, it became recognised in the mid twentieth century that order also arises out of chaos. It does this cyclically at boundaries or surfaces, which means energy flows from lower to higher concentration over time periods that begin and end in a process called syntropy. Life processes are syntropic, and a variety of these can be distinguished in regard to plants, so let’s look at what these are.

In the soil, the processes involved in life are mineral release, nitrogen fixation, digestion and nutrient uptake. These are related to the lime complex commonly referred to as the CEC or as cations. Because biodynamics comes from an awareness of the influences of the context on life processes, these processes are correlated with the planets between the sun and the earth, namely mercury, venus and the moon.

However, plants live both in the soil AND the atmosphere, and in the atmosphere the processes are quite different and complimentary to the soil processes. What goes on in the atmosphere is photosynthesis, blossoming, fruiting and ripening. These processes are related to silica and to the planets beyond the sun and the earth, namely mars, Jupiter and Saturn.

In large part, biodynamics involves getting a dynamic interplay going between what goes on above ground and what goes on below.

Plants draw in energy and carbon—the basis of life—via photosynthesis. By doing so, they build up sugars and carbohydrates in their sap during the day and a portion of this drains down to plants’ root tips and are exuded into the soil around the tender young root growth of the plant. This feeds a honey-like syrup to the soil foodweb which uses the energy to release minerals such as silica, lime and phosphorous along with various trace mineral co-factors that provide for nitrogen fixation.

Nitrogen fixation is VERY energy intensive as it takes roughly 10 units of sugar to fix one unit of amino acid. Moreover, nitrogen fixing microbes don’t just gift the nitrogen they fix to plants. However, protozoa and other soil animal life eat mineral releasing and nitrogen fixing microbes, thus excreting a steady stream of freshly digested milk-like nourishment rich in amino acids and minerals chelates, which the plant takes up from the soil. This milk-like nourishment is the basis for chlorophyll assembly in the leaf and for the duplication of the DNA and the protein chemistry basic to plant growth.

From the biodynamic point of view it is enormously important that the soluble salt levels in the soil are as low as possible while the insoluble but available nutrients stored in humus are abundant. Partly this is because when the plant takes up amino acids instead of nitrogen salts the efficiency of the plant chemistry is dramatically increased and photosynthetic efficiency is multiplied. Also, soluble salts in the soil are toxic to the nitrogen fixing and mineral releasing micro-life in the soil as soluble salts amount to their waste, in which case they shut down and fail to function as might be expected of any organism which had to live in its own waste.

Making Rain

The Dallas/Austin Drive and RAIN

 

Shabari and I flew in to Georgia from Australia and after less than a week of settling in at Bird’s Nest, planting gardens and preparing for the Weston A. Price convention we drove out to Dallas. The Weston A. Price convention was awesome with something like 1,500 attendees and luminaries like Jerry Brunetti and Michael Schmidt—just to mention two—presenting.

Jerry, a livestock nutritionist and farm advisor, healed himself from advanced type B lymphoma with nutrition, while Michael, a gentle and perceptive biodynamic dairy farmer of immense dedication has spearheaded the raw milk movement in Canada at the pointy end of government suppression. In particular, Dr. Mercola was a vibrant presence that resonated with me, as he related his path to learning was paved—like my own—by learning how to learn. What an awesome presence and presentation! To get a better taste of what went on there at the Dallas Sheraton—the largest convention hotel in Texas and largest Sheraton in the world—you’ll probably have to surf the internet.

However, Shabari and I were concerned about the drought that had afflicted Texas—particularly since January 2011, but also over the last few years—and she made contact with Steve Diver, Gary Freeborg, Coleman Kelly, Bill McCrainy and others she knew or knew of that were involved with biodynamic agriculture in the Austin area where they hadn’t had a decent rain event in eleven months and were in what looked like a historical dry cycle.

For whatever reasons, Shabari and I have independently studied weather and rain cycles from a wide range of similar viewpoints and we were aware that sequential application of the biodynamic preparations has a history of breaking droughts and bringing into the areas where these preparations are applied whatever is needed for life to thrive. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways. So in the Austin area we visited farms where I set up a couple of field broadcasters to broadcast preparation patterns. We also had classes at the Casa de Luz where I described what was happening with biodynamics and biodynamic preparations and got some things going with applications of biodynamic preparations in a variety of locations. Steve Diver and Bill McCrainy were especially helpful in getting stirring and spraying of BD preps going on the ground in a couple different locations, and Seaton Collard took on radionic applications of the sequential sprays as well. So far the result has been, you guessed it, rain within 24 hours of the first application for the greater Austin area.

There’s a lot more to the story, of course. It’s all about life forces and MODERATE rain rather than devastating rain, because when things are healthy is when life forces are cooking and balanced and rain occurs in CYCLES so you don’t get either too much or too little. In actual fact it is easier to get tired of too much rain as compared to too little. It’s easier to survive a drought than a flood, as long as neither one is too extreme. This sequential spray procedure, developed chiefly by Hugh Courtney (Josephine Porter Institute of Applied Biodynamics) with key input from Harvey Lisle and support by yours truly, Hugh Lovel, makes that happen in an organic, life supporting way. If you want to know more, get involved with sequential spraying of the biodynamic preparations and study what happens. It undoubtedly will help to explore our website and take courses, download content, but above all get involved with applying the preparations. There’s a lot of information out there to corroborate what’s on our website and by all means do wider searches.

How To Make Rain 2012

            “A living organism has the astonishing gift of concentrating a ‘stream of order’ on itself, thus escaping the decay into atomic chaos.” –Erwin Schrödinger

            “It is the anomalies in nature that reveal the principles of life.” –Goethe

 

Enriching the Atmosphere By Hugh Lovel

 

My experience over the last 25 years shows it is possible to restore order to the atmosphere, a pre-requisite for rain. This could be an important part of returning farmers to self-sufficiency, and the methods— biodynamic sequential spraying, and/or radionic treatments with biodynamic reagents in combinations with color, sound and intents—are cheap and within the ability of most farmers to accomplish with relatively simple equipment. Only the know-how is lacking.

Weather is always changing, though it follows a pattern that oscillates back and forth within limits. Whenever it gets too hot and/or too dry it self-corrects to become cooler or wetter or both. However, this oscillation has obscure trigger points. MIT mathematician Edward Lorentz made this discovery in the mid ‘50s, giving rise to Chaos Theory. Chaos is a fact, but theory seeks to explain how it gives rise to order. Water evaporates, chaotically into the atmosphere. What makes it concentrate in clouds so dense they drop rain in certain places and at certain times—but not others?

 

The Stewardship of Rain

 

Often there is plenty of moisture in the air but no rain. Particularly in the southeastern USA the humidity can be 95% along with 95℉ without a cloud in the sky. In such conditions I can’t seem to draw much vitality from the atmosphere because it has so little. It is significantly worse in urban areas such as Atlanta, Georgia where summer thundershowers move across from western Douglas County, break up, go around urban Fulton and DeKalb counties, and resume their rain pattern in eastern Rockdale County. The traffic and industrial fumes that repel moisture and fuel the urban haze only abate on the weekends where weather statistics show 20% greater chances of rain on the family barbecue than on the weekday commute. What are we doing?

Global weather is a complicated self-correcting system. There is debate about the causes of global warming, but one thing is certain—global temperatures have risen. Polar icecaps show accelerated melting, especially in the northern hemisphere, and many glaciers world-wide are disappearing. Most importantly the temperatures of equatorial oceans show gains of roughly half a degree Celsius over the last 50 or so years, and heat drives the world’s weather because evaporation from the equatorial oceans puts the moisture into the atmosphere that fuels storms.

Roughly 89.5 billion acres of the earth’s surface is covered by water, and an acre-inch of water is 193,460 gallons. This means if evaporation was constant at merely an inch a year, rather than an inch or so a month, this would amount to 17.3 quadrillion gallons of water per year. That is 17.3 million billion gallons of water. Even a slight rise in the temperature of equatorial oceans means millions upon millions more gallons of water rise into the atmosphere. No one is sure exactly how much, but it all has to fall somewhere. Wherever moderate rainfall becomes scarcer and scarcer because ground cover is lost or pollution increases, floods become more common a few hundred miles away. Droughts in Chad, Sudan and Somalia correspond with floods in Mozambique and Tanzania. Droughts in Siberia are related to floods in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Alternatively, droughts in the Indus and Ganges watersheds produce floods along the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers. Drought in North America is accompanied by floods from the UK to Russia. If we reversed the conditions that lead to drought—such as bare soil and pollution—we would restore order to the atmosphere and return to normal rainfall while preventing floods. This would be an act of environmental responsibility.

 

Background

 

As earth and sky interact, we cannot revitalize the atmosphere without revitalizing the soil—in which case we should consider how wrongly most soils are fertilized. According to Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary a fertilizer is any substance that when applied to the soil makes it more fertile. However, the Fertilizer Institute and the industries behind them have secured the passage of laws requiring fertilizers to be soluble. Though the industry’s agenda is transparent, good sense says we don’t want our nutrients to be soluble, we want them to be insoluble but available—which is what occurs when the nutrients are stored and retained by the life of the soil. Then, by the teeming symbiosis characteristic of healthy soil, sufficient nutrients for robust crop production will be steadily available and the soil will be truly fertile.

Under present laws lime and other rock dusts must be advertised as soil amendments rather than fertilizers. Balanced, well-humified compost, which is even more crucial to building soil fertility, also is classified as an amendment rather than a fertilizer, as most of its nutrients are insoluble though available. On the other hand the massive use of soluble nitrogen ‘fertilizers’ such as anhydrous ammonia, urea or nitrates is like intoxicating oneself on a diet of amphetamines and ignoring healthy, balanced nutrition. Then everything goes like the clappers—until at some point it doesn’t go very well at all. Resting strong soils may return them to productivity, but eventually the collapse will be fatal if irresponsible soil practices don’t change. Obviously building soil biology and eliminating reliance on poisons would help the atmosphere immeasurably. There is a science to this. It can be done, but given the inertia of the present system it won’t be done soon. It may take massive losses in the agricultural sector for these changes to occur. In the interim what can we—who want to protect ourselves and moderate the damage—do?

 

Sequential Spraying

 

In the late 80s Hugh Courtney of the Josephine Porter Institute in Woolwine, VA was experimenting with applying the entire array of biodynamic preparations in close conjunction with each other. At a biodynamic conference on my farm we followed a sequence of evening barrel compound (BC), morning horsetail decoction (BD 508), evening horn manure (BD 500) and morning horn silica (BD 501), —thus applying all the preps Rudolf Steiner introduced in his Agriculture Course over a two day period. Courtney called it an energy balancing procedure, which he tested on his farm in Woolwine, Virginia and introduced at workshops in various parts of the country.

Hugh Courtney also suggested following up the prep sequence with milk and honey. Having a land flowing with milk and honey is a Biblical idea that implies a countryside rich in nourishment for the whole human being, both physically and spiritually. Since milk is related to calcium and the soil, the milk potency should be sprayed in the evening on the soil. As for honey, it is related to the silica activities of the daytime and should be sprayed in the air in the morning.

 

Further Experiments

 

During the late 80s, 90s and early 00s there were repeated summer droughts in the American Southeast, but wherever this sequence was employed at least technical precipitation if not outright rain followed within 72 hours. Hugh Courtney explained this as the ability of the BD preps to attract whatever was needed, and his experiments indicated that best success with making rain was likely if the sequence began in a water constellation and was completed just prior to full moon when watery forces were strongest.

Early on in the development of this procedure I started using radionics as an application of the axiom of fluid dynamics—often called the butterfly effect—that a microscopic change at a point can effect large scale changes in the medium. With an aerial map of my farm as my witness, I used my double-dial Hieronymus variable capacitance instrument with vials of the various preps as reagents along with double-dial rates that I obtained by cold scanning. I alternated applications while I fixed supper with applications when I fixed breakfast, dowsing for the duration of each application and using a timer in the circuit that would shut off the instrument while I was out at work on the farm or elsewhere. For the most part I was successful in getting timely rainfall even when the rest of Georgia was experiencing drought. On challenging occasions I learned to use color beamed into the instrument’s witness well,  along with herbal and mineral reagents, and I even used pictures and played recordings of rain—and whale songs, such exuberance!—along with my radionic programs. I became so confident of getting rain when I needed it that I gave my irrigation equipment away.

I also learned to use Malcolm Rae type equipment with cards for the biodynamic preparation patterns along with an interrupter in the circuit that turned the instrument on and off hundreds of times a minute to create the effect of myriad butterflys flapping their infinitessimal corrections rather than creating a single one off event. In 2005 I purchased a Power Radionic program for my computer from a dealer in HSCTI products in Woodstock, Georgia, ( http://www.hscti.net/index.html ) and with that I ran radionic programs on my computer—which opened up even further options.

In November, 2011 my wife, Shabari, and I flew in from Australia for the Weston A. Price convention in Dallas, TX and were shocked to see the devastation of the previous 10 months of drought. We organised a series of workshops in the Austin area focusing on sequential spraying and within the week most of the participants were rewarded by rain. But we know how much enthusiasm and diligence it takes to keep something like this going, and how easy it can be to lose confidence in the beginning. The tricks of the trade are myriad, and we share many of these on our RAIN CD, available from our website at www.quantumagriculture.com . We expect to be at the ACRES Convention in December.

 

 

Hugh Lovel and his wife, Shabari Bird Lovel live in Australia though they spend their northern winter months in Blairsville, Georgia where they hold a six day advanced course in Quantum Agriculture in early February. Shabari can be contacted at shabaribird@gmail.com and Hugh at hugh.lovel9@bigpond.com .

 

*****


Sidebar One:

 

Sequential Spraying—adapted from Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993).

 

In advance of each stirring draw 3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon bucket. If the water is chlorinated, leave overnight or stir for 30 minutes to outgas as much of the chlorine as possible. The water ideally should be warm, i.e. in the vicinity of 65 – 72℉. It may be warmed with sunlight, wood or gas, though electricity is not so ideal.

1st Evening: Barrel Compound (BC)—The first afternoon, add a one acre unit of barrel compound (⅓ cup) to three gallons of water and stir as below for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

Stirring: With arm or stirring stick, stir round and round to create a strong vortex. The water will become organized into laminar layers so that the cooler, denser layers move to the middle and sink while the warmer layers seek the edges and rise. The appearance is one of a spinning funnel and the water is organized. At this point reverse the direction of stirring. The water will churn and froth in chaos until a new vortex organizes. Once the new vortex is mature the direction is reversed again, and again, back and forth, 20 minutes each for BC and 508 and 1 hour each for 500 and 501. Every time a new vortex is established a new generation of organization is created. Organization is the basis of life, as living organisms are organized. By creating generation after generation of order, an evolution of order results. This charges up the remedy with life force while imparting the intentions and vibrations of the stirrer to the water. Then what one thinks, one grows.

Spraying: This spray should soak into the soil, much as does the dew, and should be sprinkled in the late afternoon in large droplets. Each drop radiates up to 6 feet, so there is no need for uniform coverage. Since life force flows from lower to higher concentration, spraying in this fashion will draw life force from the surrounding cosmos to the location sprayed. A pail and a wallpaper brush or whiskbroom is sufficient for applying this remedy.

1st Morning: Horsetail Decoction (508)—Prior to stirring, make a decoction, which is a brew simmered for 20 minutes, from 8 ounces of dried horsetail herb in ¾ gallon of water. In the early morning, dilute the pre-made decoction to 3 gallons with warm water and stir as above for 20 minutes. Apply this preparation to evaporate upward.

1st Evening: Horn Manure (500)—Add a one acre unit (¼ cup) of horn manure to three gallons of warm water and stir for 1 hour. Spray on the soil in large droplets.

2nd Morning: Horn Silica (501)— Add a one acre unit of horn silica (1 gram) to three gallons of water and stir as before for an hour. In summer, spray this remedy as a mist so it radiates upward into the lower atmosphere as a fine mist over the leaf canopy, perhaps chest or head high in the early morning. It may settle before evaporating, which is good. In winter, when warmth and light have receded into the earth, this should be misted directly onto the soil.

3rd Evening: Milk—In the evening, dilute a pint of milk in 3 gallons of warm water and stir for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

3rd Morning: Honey—In the early morning, dilute an ounce of honey in 3 gallons of water and stir for 20 minutes. Apply as a fine mist that evaporates upward.

4th Evening: Repeat Sequence from beginning starting with barrel compost.

 

Biodynamic preparations can be obtained at a modest cost from The Josephine Porter Institute (JPI), P. O. Box 133, Woolwine, Virginia 24185-0133. Tel: (276)930 – 2463 (Mon-Fri 8am-5pm). www.jpibiodynamics.org/

 


*****

 

Sidebar Two:

 

El Niño/La Niña

 

The Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest driver of evaporation and weather. Scientists have long studied something called the Southern Oscillation or the irregular but periodic shift of tropical warmth between the western Pacific and eastern Pacific Oceans.

With an El Niño the eastern Pacific Ocean becomes noticeably warmer off the coast of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, generally around Christmas. The resulting evaporation of moisture rises into the upper atmosphere, accelerated by the Andes Mountains. This charges up the upper atmosphere with moisture which tends to shift precipitation toward the polar latitudes. This generally means droughts for large parts of the world. However, this can only go on so long before evaporation brings in cold currents in the lower ocean to replenish what evaporated. This cools off the El Niño cycle and shifts the balance of warmth back toward the western Pacific.

La Niña, on the other hand, is a condition of elevated warmth in the western Pacific where there is no wall of high mountains. This sends moisture up into the lower atmosphere driving monsoons.

Until the age of Chaos Theory the trend in science was to study things by reducing them to extreme simplicity. Scientists struggling to use a systems approach that included as many variables as possible were relegated to the fringes and sometimes ridiculed. However, with weather—as with agriculture—single factor analysis is the apex of absurdity. Fortunately the age of computing has provided the tools for modeling complex systems involving many variables.

Taken as a whole, our stable global weather cycles have been going on since the dawn of history, fed and driven by warmth and other organizational factors—though recent global warming seems to have raised our weather intensity a bit. From a longer perspective, however, the world has alternated between long glacial periods and brief inter-glacials, and the tipping points are obscure. There seem to have been periods, occasionally, where the poles melted and ocean levels were considerably higher. Presently we seem on the cusp of change, but whether that will be to a warmer cycle or an ice age is uncertain.

Chaos theory scientists acknowledge the obscurity of organizational factors by giving them such names as the “strange attractor” and the “butterfly effect”. Modeling organizational factors has been a challenge, especially for scientists who previously believed everything simply degenerated into chaos. How to describe the rise of order out of chaos?

At least we can study warmth. Obviously the earth is warmest around the equator and coolest near the poles. This means the atmosphere heats up and expands near the equator and shrinks at the poles, which is what drives weather. Around the equator the portion of the earth’s atmosphere where weather occurs—known as the troposphere—is roughly 10 miles deep, while near the poles it is only about 5 miles deep. This means that air warms and rises around the equator, and as it cools it slides off on a downhill path known as a thermocline towards the poles where it funnels down one or the other polar vortex driving winter storms. The stronger the evaporation around the equator the more strongly this drives winter storms—and the occurrence of more powerful winter storms is one of the signs of global warming.

The oceans do something similar with the Gulf Stream and the Japan Current sliding down thermoclines toward Norway and Alaska. However, the melting of the northern polar icecap may shut down the Gulf Stream’s thermocline, which has weather scientists wondering whether that means a new ice age for northern Europe and Siberia. Could global warming be the trigger for an ice age? Alas, there are many unknowns, but most notably, the oscillation of surface temperatures between the eastern and western Pacific has a pronounced effect on evaporation and thus on rainfall, with the tilt of the earth’s axis as a major factor in causing oscillations. The fact that Pacific warming trends are strongest around Christmas when the sun is furthest south earns this cycle the title of the Southern Oscillation.

As stated previously, the periodic effect of the Southern Oscillation is irregular, and the key to its better management would be identifying and understanding such organizational factors as the strange attractor and the butterfly effect. Familiarity with the biodynamic preparations as organizational factors used in agriculture is a logical starting point for such research.

 

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Sidebar Three:

 

From Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993). –By Hugh Courtney
First of all, the sequential spraying technique was developed by myself, almost accidentally, in the early summer of 1988 when it appeared that we were about to face a third year of blistering drought. Frustrated by that possibility, I reasoned that surely there had to be something in biodynamic agriculture that could relieve or at least ameliorate the damage to our pastures, hayfields and gardens, after all, had not Steiner himself in the Agriculture course, (see Lecture #5, especially page 89), suggested that the preparations could help the plant attract to itself from its environment what was needed for its best growth? I thought surely, if one knew precisely what preparations to use, then relief should be available somehow. That is if one assumes that biodynamics really is valid and truly works. In my case, however, I did not have the wisdom to know the precise preparation to use.

At this point in my work with the preparations, I was convinced that it would be fairly difficult to cause harm with them, even if one used them in a situation that did not seem appropriate.
The worst thing in such a case would be that their effects could be reduced or negligible. So, I chose to use all nine of them. The six compost preparations were applied in the form of Barrel Compost (Thun recipe) along with BD #500, BD #501, and BD #508. I reasoned that I should commence in the evening with Barrel Compost, since the generally accepted biodynamic practice is to begin with the compost preparations. I followed the next morning with BD #508, and since I had been very much impressed with the work of Lilly Kolisko, and since I already had some on hand, I chose to use the fermented version of BD #508 as detailed in her work, Agriculture of Tomorrow. In the evening of the second day I applied the BD #500. On the morning of the third day, I sprayed the BD #501(c) which is a crystal silica material found in a matrix of rectorite, a clay-like substance. I had been experimenting with this form of #501 and had been very pleased with the results to this point, so it was an obvious choice for me.
Since I was treating hayfields, and was very interested in the water element anyway, I chose to apply the sequence in a leaf period, which turned out to be just before the full moon,  on the 26th, 27th and 28th of June 1988. Sometime within the following night, we received a nice, lengthy , soaking rain which totaled around .9 of an inch.

Homeopathc Fungicide/Quantum Physics

Can I use homeopathc fungicide on mushroom?how remedy recognize fungal pathogen of edible fungi? if I use silica and on mycelliom of both of mushroom and fungi, does remedy  inhibit growth of both of them or just pathogen?

– Toktam

Dear Toktam,

I believe you must consider that with homeopathy we are dealing with quantum effects—the fact that everything has a wave pattern as well as a physical presence. With the wave pattern we are dealing with probability, and what we see as observation is the selection of a single probability—a unique physical occurrence—out of this ocean of probability. This means what the observer looks for determines what is observed, and what is observed determines which—out of the zillions of possibilities—is the reality.

 

Heisenberg’s theory of indeterminancy—usually translated as Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle—boils down to what we seek we find, and that means we determine the realities we inhabit. Like many things about quantum theory this principle—which is 100% accurate in predicting experiments—rather bends the mind about what formerly was believed as true and possible in physics. For at least a couple hundred years the predominant belief was that the observer and the phenomenon were separate, while quantum theory accepted that the observer and the phenomenon were inseparably linked. The undeniable truth was that at the particle/wave level what you looked for you found, and experiments continue to reveal that what occurs at the level of atomic and sub atomic particles can and must also be true at every level of the universe. Of course, chaos can render quantum selection meaningless due to randomization, and if chaos ruled the universe then quantum effects would end up being meaningless. But chaos gives rise to order, and this too is undeniable.  At first quantum effects were believed to apply only to events at the particle level where a few electrons or protons were involved, but now, irrefutable experimental evidence continues to build up that quantum effects are occurring at levels of great complexity—particularly with biological processes. In the last several years patents have been applied for that involve faster than light and unbreakable encryption of communications. Quantum computers that are tens of trillions of times faster and smarter than present day Cray super computers are on the drawing boards—with the human brain being the ultimate model of complexity.

 

Under these circumstances it is no longer silly to imagine that what we think we create. So if you use these biodynamic preparation patterns to stimulate beneficial mushrooms and to suppress pathogenic types, then you can expect this activity as a result. According to all the rules, if you imagine this is and must be true, then it will prove true.

 

I’m a sceptic. As a sceptic I want to SEE things; otherwise I’m not inclined to believe them. So I look for them. I hold in my mind a mental image of whatever phenomenon I am looking for. Experience then tends to coincide with this mental image. A complex phenomenon may take a while to materialize, but at the particle level phenomena are simple enough the results are immediate.

 

However, there is the cynic, who may and often does pose as a sceptic. The cynic knows already that this or that is utter bunk and cannot be true. His mental image of this picture is locked in stone. Thus in his vicinity and wherever his followers follow him, he proves this true by imposing his view on his surroundings. So quantum effects such as dowsing for water or applying homeopathic remedies, radionic treatments, etc. are hopelessly ineffective around the cynic because his belief system negates the possibility that these things can work and thus they don’t. The cynic is the proverbial spanner in the works.

 

Both views are in perfect agreement with quantum physics, but the question you must answer is which view do you espouse?

 

Best wishes,

Hugh Lovel

Fruit Tree problems and Solutions

Dear Kym and Heinz, It all seems mysterious at first.  I gather the two of you picked up on Glen Atkinson’s masterful grasp of the forces of the surrounding universe and how the various types influence our lives and environment. I’ve been knowing this bloke (Glen), who originally is from the Sunshine Coast of Queensland, for close to 20 years, and I think we were enormously lucky he could attend and participate in our Advanced Course. While I cognited more than 40 years ago in quantum chemistry class that astrology is valid as a means of identifying how the universe, both large and small, contributes to our lives, I am nowhere near the astrologer that Glen is. Listen to your Dennis Klocek Macro/Micro lectures on your course materials disc. Dennis is another such astrologer/biodynamic scholar like Glen is. Ten years or so ago Dennis used to do a weather forecasting website where he used astrology to predict hurricane paths and intensities. Living in the southeastern US I sometimes used to watch his predictions, which were far more accurate, detailed and prescient than the US weather bureau’s.  Mysterious as it may seem at first, there is a science to all of this, and we can sort it out using the tools we have. Considering that Glen is in the business of selling agricultural products whose active ingredient is water, it is good that he also tries to share the understanding of dynamic geometry (astrology), the periodic table and biodynamics that he used to develop his product line. For the past decade I’ve refused to use Glen’s products because they can easily be copied radionically and his formulations are proprietary. As soon as I put some product on the market that copied his I’d be accused of copying and undercutting him, and I refuse to go there. Besides, the important thing is the understanding, and I truly do respect all the work he’s done. So now Shabari has made up her mind to distribute his products in Australia, which kind of puts the shoe on the other foot. Frost Protect, Bird Scare, etc. formulas will remain secret and Shabari will sell them. But in dealing with the broader picture, let’s sort out our problems and how to deal with them at every level and in every way possible using the tools we have, which includes Glen’s insights into how the preparations work with the different planets, constellations, elements, ethers and dimensions.  Glen and I did a workshop together in the Willamette Valley in Oregon back in 2001 or so and at the time we had a huge private discussion about where the various elements of the periodic table fit into what he calls his Gyroscopic Agriculture model and what he calls The Apple Of Life. At this point I realized that what previously had been a mystery to me regarding the geometry of the electron orbitals that a century of nuclear physics (since Bohr) mapped out could be resolved through mathematics of dimensions (geometry) if hydrogen and helium were treated as one dimensional vortices and each successive octave (based on lemniscular motion) was seen as adding a dimension to the picture.  Don’t worry about the maths, but this is what gives the various elements of the periodic table their functions in regard to each other. It means that carbon, a two dimensional element of surfaces (a chemical element), has the information of all the possible forms in the universe writ on its surfaces, or if you prefer, etched upon the planes of its particle vortices and their potential interactions.  Now carbon is only two dimensional (chemical) while silicon is three dimensional–which makes it a physical element. Calcium is four dimensional, which makes it etheric. Following calcium are the 4D transition metals that are key for all the enzyme/hormone processes associated with living organisms–all forth dimensional. How can we use this sort of thing? We’ve had a big problem in agriculture with identifying the causes of things. The result has been a long series of patches that only treated symptoms and left the underlying causes untouched. With the above sort of information we can identify causes.  It shouldn’t be any wonder that good old 3D silicon (along with sulphur, also a 3D physical element) forms all the cell walls and connective tissues (along with hydrogen (spirit) and the chemical elements)  that provide physical structure for living organisms. If we want this structure to be strong, resilient, durable, robust, etc. we have to ensure the availability of silicon (in partnership with magnesium and phosphorous). The chemical elements of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen support this with boron and fluorine as chemical co-factors in ensuring the fluidity and functionality of Si, Na, Mg, P, S and Cl. So the chemical elements (carbon and its mates) lie behind the creation of the physical structures composed of silicon and its mates. (I hope I haven’t lost you yet] The point is the internal, life (etheric) processes that allow for growth and reproduction of these silica structures is the business of calcium and potassium and their co-factors (lime and the transition metals).  So when we have a physical, structural problem, such as the skin of a nectarine or cherry or the stems that hold them on the tree it has to be silicon. We don’t have to think twice about it. Structural problems are silica problems. On the other hand, when we have an internal problem such as flavour, nutrition, growth, sizing in fruit development, anything metabolic, etc. it is a calcium problem. It has to be since these 4th dimensional processes go beyond the physical structure. But since what takes place on the insides of cells depends on what hold them together and feeds them from the outside, the lack of sizing in the early development of fruits depends not only on the nutrient supply of calcium, carbohydrates and amino acids, but the containment and delivery system that goes back to silicon and its mates. So a lack of boron and/or silicon will result in poor sizing in the early development of fruits (calcium) and poor filling out with sugars and flavours (potassium) in later development. Why do we have fungi, on the one hand, or insect problems on the other? One is a deranged etheric situation and related to an excess of watery lunar forces; the other is a deranged astral situation and related to the dry/warm solar forces. Whether these problems occur above ground or below ground also tells us things that relate to the seasons and conditions where these problems originated, which may greatly precede the time period when they show up. But we’ve got the tools to sort these situations out and remedy them at the cause rather than trying to patch them through once the problems show up. This, for example, should show Kym why splitting occurs in cherries. It isn’t all that much a problem of having a rainy harvest. The cherries split when their connective tissues and membranes are weak. This is a problem of stress and lack of silicon/boron/fluoride in the early, early structural development of the connective tissues of the fruit. So forget fixing it once you see it. That’s not where it occurred. It occurred where there was a disconnect between the warmth/light/silica forces associated with Saturn and the chemical/life/calcium forces associated with the Moon–combine too much watery nitrates in the soil along with cloudy, cool days in the early spring following fruit set and you have a problem.  How to address it? In this case it is VERY important on the one hand to spray horn silica on the soil in the winter to build up warmth and light and silica in the soil. On the other hand it is VERY important to have a good annual cereal/legume cover in the orchard and that the cereals suck up nitrates and deliver amino acids and lime as they are digested. Judgment needs to be used concerning mowing of the cereal cover (and probably planting a summer cover at the same time) following fruit set so the weather and nutrient flows are managed for optimum nourishment of the juvenile fruit crop. Also keep some phytolacca and nettle ferments going along with appropriate herbal BD preps to use in fine-tuning this dance with the weather.   Enough for now. Do you guys see where I’m going with this? You can’t even think about these things–they would remain a mystery–without having a framework such as astrology to make sense out of the warmth and light activities/elements of saturn and how this works with the chemistry and life activities/elements of the moon. For certain I don’t know much about specific problems because there are so many and they vary considerably from place to place and year to year. All I know is there are ways of sorting out the causes and shifting the situations at their points of cause. Sometimes it takes me a while to sort things out, and a discussion would be very helpful. So when you have problems, how about if we have a go at sorting them out as a group discussion? Then we’d all learn. And when you are at the top of your game you’ll keep things balanced and never even get new problems that sweep the industry. As you can see, I have a lot of time for you guys. Best wishes,Hug