Radionic instruments code the vibrational quality of substance in terms of a chain of numbers.

Radionics Cards used by Quantum Agriculture Radionic Instruments are printed with magnetic ink on high quality photo paper. They work best with Quantum Ag Instruments.

Magneto Geometry was developed by Malcolm Rae, one of a group of pioneering Doctors, Homoeopaths and Radionic researchers working in Britain from the 1940s through to the 1980s. This group included Dr. George Laurence, founder of the Psionic Medical Association; George de la Warr; Dr Aubrey Westlake; Dr Guyon Richards; John Da Monte; David Tansley, and others.

Rae himself had a distinguished career in the Royal Navy, where he rose to the rank of Commander during World War II. While in the Navy he was introduced to Radionics by a Captain Atkinson. Although he rejected Radionics at the time, he later became interested in it during the 1950s and carried on to develop remarkable new techniques and instruments. Some of this work is described in detail in the book DIMENSIONS OF RADIONICS by Tansley, Rae and Westlake (ISBN 0-914732-29-3).

At first Rae worked with ‘conventional’ Radionic instruments, derived from the work of Abrams and Drown. These instruments coded the vibrational quality of a selected substance in terms of a chain of numbers – Diamond, for example, is 442337. Rae discovered that distinct pendulum reactions are obtained at certain angular relations to the earth’s magnetic field. These may be marked within the circle (see below) as radial lines. The resolution of each line is to one degree of arc. The result is a system of cards, two of which are illustrated below. There are currently more than 25,000 cards in the MGA system.

         

These cards are used in various instruments designed by Rae, Nick Franks and Hugh Lovel, and may also be used in the contemporary range of instruments.  Kelly Research ANALYSER is used to build up a picture of the quality of the patient’s energy field  to discover any disturbances to it. The basic method is Location (e.g. Respiratory system) – Factor (e.g. Infection) – and Correction (e.g. Homeopathic remedy).

Quantum Ag Radionic Instrument with manual available from Quantum Agriculture Consultants worldwide. Quantumagproducts@gmail.com for more information.

 

Why I Use Radionics

Why I Use Radionics

By Hugh Lovel

 

In one breath, I am a biodynamic grower who uses radionics precisely because it works with life instead of death. 

Many erroneous ideas about radionics are bandied about, almost like confetti at a celebration, and clarity is long overdue. One of these ideas, common amongst detractors who condemn radionics without investigation, is that radionics works with electricity. This is like saying that music works with electricity because you can listen to it using an electrical device. Saying that radionics works with electricity is misleading and hysterical, and it is time to set the record straight.

HUGH LOVEL, SHABARI BIRD AND ED KELLY of Kelly Research RADIONICS FOR QUANTUM AGRICULTURE   WORKSHOP  FEB 6, 2016   Blairsville, GA  706-745-8202

What Is Radionics?

 

The term radionics comes from the realization that everything, without exception, gives off its own characteristic radiating pattern or wave form, and a radionic instrument can be anything which channels such patterns. My favourite radionic instrument is a piece of paper with an iris pattern printed on it, and the most popular radionic devices in use today are the Sri Sanjeevini cards that are simple sets of sector marks within a circular, nine lobed lotus pattern. Sanjeevini cards usually are printed on paper and are used daily by hundreds of thousands of people in India and throughout the world. Anyone who is interested can find these cards at: 

http://www.saisanjeevini.org/cardshtm/b1_6.htm


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      Projection Wheel                                           

 

I was introduced to radionics by T. Galen Hieronymus and his wife, Sarah, who lived within 65 miles of me in Georgia. Galen was one of the early radionic pioneers and held the only U.S. Patent ever issued for radionic gear. http://quantumagriculture.com/authors/galen-hieronymous

Galen’s patent examiner insisted that he name the mysterious energy that made his invention work. Although Galen had proven neither electricity nor optics were involved, he saw that the organisational energy he was working with had much in common with both electricity and optics. So, in the patent examiner’s office he threw caution to the winds, called it ‘eloptic’ energy and won his patent. “Biggest misnomer there ever was.” is what told me.

 

Life and Death

 

When thinking about life I distinguish between lively health and vitality and barely scraping along on the threshold of oblivion. What I mean is the difference between syntropy and entropy. Entropy is a process of dispersal, dissolution and death; a process where energy becomes increasingly unavailable. Syntropy is a process of building order, complexity and organisation; a process of increasingly building stores of available energy. Life is syntropic as it defies entropy, and the more strongly it does this the more alive it is. Death runs down while life runs up. 

Many in our culture believe that only entropy exists—yet, strangely enough, many of these same people believe in evolution. If there was only entropy an embryo would never become a child or a mature adult. Clouds would not gather moisture into themselves and concentrate it strongly enough to give us rain. Forests would never grow, and what we know as fertile soil would never have developed. In the words of Nobel Prize winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger (1887—1961) “Living organisms have the remarkable ability to concentrate a stream of order on themselves.” 

One of our problems in recognizing the nature of life is its dynamic quality. Life is a process rather than the mass and volume of substance involved. It seems life must be measured by qualitative means, rather than weight or volume. Would any farmer deny that some soils and some farms are more alive than others even though they may be of similar size and other physical measures? Likewise some foods are far richer in vitality, flavour, balance and wholesomeness than others, even though they may measure the same in minerals, carbohydrates or proteins—just look at sugar and honey, raw milk and boiled milk or fresh fruits and processed foods.

 

Patterns and Boundaries

 

As paper radionic devices illustrate, radionics is about patterns. Patterns define boundaries and this gives rise to order. Order provides organization, which is what makes living organisms alive. Think of organization as a process that arises at boundaries and is the basis of life. Where death energy disperses, such as we see with electricity—life energy builds from lower to higher concentration. Then when a point is reached in the process where an organism dies and its boundaries and syntropic processes fail, it becomes entropic and disintegrates.

The power of boundaries is so phenomenal it tends to escape our notice, as we need to grasp the idea before we can see the phenomenon. Mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot hardly had any idea what would develop when he started defining boundaries with the simple formula Z = Z2 + C. What he discovered was an astonishing profusion of organic forms that revealed layer after layer of complexity and gave rise to a branch of mathematics known today as fractals. The Mandelbrot Set—which arises from the equation above—is a classic case of beautiful, organic mathematics. Below is a link to download a Mandelbrot Set generator that can be entertaining to play with. http://wareseeker.com/free-mandelbrot-set-generator/


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Overview of the Mandelbrot Set (Z = Z2 + C) prior to magnification.

 

The Edge Effect

 

Permaculturists often describe the boundary phenomenon as the edge effect, and the idea is to strive, insofar as possible, to maximize this edge effect in landscape design. This enriches the pattern density of an area and enlivens it. A palpable increase in the vitality of a landscape is observable as the edge effect is increased, even though we must remember that vitality is measured qualitatively rather than quantitatively. 

The human organism is a huge collection of boundaries and patterns from the outer boundaries of skin, hair and nails to the double helix spirals of our DNA to the resonant wave patterns of our sub-atomic particles. 

It took me a long time, heaps of observations of nature and several readings of Steiner’s Agriculture Course to understand life processes and how they arise out of chaos into organization, and I wouldn’t blame anyone who struggles with this idea. In our culture today we’ve been taught that life is some kind of absolute that cannot be evaluated—something is either alive or it isn’t. From this point of view a person on life support is considered fully alive—until he isn’t. Of course, we CAN tell when the life essence has fully departed as the corpse left behind disintegrates. But how can we ignore the difference between a tree in its prime and growing well and a tree that is hollow, rotten and riddled with termites? How can we pretend that each embody the same degree of aliveness?

 

Comparisons 

 

It might give rise to ill-feeling to compare the vitality of our farm with our neighbours’. In the first place we’d do better comparing our paddocks to the roadside, since the roadside is more likely to be doing whatever the natural potential of the land is, if left unfarmed. The paddocks we work with may be flogged almost to oblivion and just barely scraping by with a fraction of the diversity of the roadsides. Showing how our own paddocks are less flogged than someone else’s is hardly an answer to raising the game of the neighbourhood to nature’s level and beyond. And we should be thinking about achieving the beyond part, because the more alive something is the more strongly it draws a stream of organization out of the cosmos. All too often our fence rows and roadsides are drawing life from the cosmos and supporting our paddocks. If we only farmed restoratively our paddocks would be drawing life out of the cosmos and feeding the roadsides.   

When we compare applications of the BD preparations by stirring and spraying with radionic patterning we tend to miss the point. The two are different approaches although they achieve similar results insofar as both can build life into the environment. I have to say, I love the easy application of patterns via radionics. This is a Godsend. I would never have gained a hundredth as much experience with what the biodynamic preparations can do without radionic treatments being so cheap and easy. To the consternation of critics, radionics encourages frequent and precise use of the biodynamic preparations, and growers stand to learn a lot. Unless the BD preps are used they do nothing and nothing is learned. 

On the other hand, stirring and spraying BD preps tends to provide people— myself included—with a more empathic and meditative modality that invites everyone to pour their souls into what they spray on their paddocks. I’m sure this is important because nature responds to feelings rather than reason. When we stir and spray with deep, heartfelt gratitude, nature responds wonderfully. I am so sure of this that I recommend radionic patterning with deep gratitude as well—but this isn’t quite the same as pouring your heart into the rhythm and tonality of stirring clockwise and anticlockwise for an hour and then spraying. Comparing the meditative stirring method, which takes more time and resources, with radionics, which is a great teaching tool, is like comparing peanuts with watermelons. I like both. Why would I only have one when I could have both? I intend to keep on stirring and spraying even if only to treat my seed potatoes or to spray around my field broadcaster.

 

 

      Biodynamic Pattern Cards from Australian Herbs

 

 The type of radionic card shown above was originally introduced by Malcolm Rae (1913 –1979), an early radionic pioneer. The design is more than symbolic as the rings provide boundaries, which give rise to organization and life. The “sector marks” within the circles provide resistance which concentrates life energy according to each pattern. Since life energy flows into wherever it is concentrated, it flows through the marks on the cards. These Malcolm Rae type cards are excellent for use with the paper projection wheel.

 Of course, more sophisticated radionic instruments offer some advantages over paper radionics. I prefer the card type instrument, which was also pioneered by Malcolm Rae. Below is a picture of the Japanese made ‘Iyachiko’ instrument (still no electricity) which features energy accumulators with both card readers and plates. The plates come in handy for materials if there are no corresponding cards, and the 0 to 999 potentiometers provide a complete range of homeopathic potencies. The sacred geometric proportions feel natural and organic, and the instrument has storage inside its lid for pattern cards and other bits as well as protecting against dust or damage. A lead from the instrument can transfer the patterns into spray tanks, irrigation systems and liquid inputs such as compost teas or activated EM brews, while the well can be used for maps or other specimen targets. Most importantly— since the essence of control is to use the exact amount of force necessary and no more or no less—the Iyachiko includes a timer and can automatically shut itself off instead of requiring the operator to shut off the instrument when pattern transfer is accomplished. 


335Hugh Lovel design Radionic Instrument

 

 

 

There was a time when I could hardly imagine how a radionic instrument could work with life energy. I simply had no concept. Over the years experience has convinced me, and as a chef and chemist I’ve found flavour and aroma are the best indicators of vital, nutritious produce. It’s that old complexity thing again.

I realize some want laboratory evidence, and there is a test, called paper disc chromatography, that Rudolf Steiner proposed for showing how much life and vitality a specimen contains. Harvey Lisle, who passed away this last year, introduced me to paper disc chromatography, and I have my own laboratory for making these chromos showing the entire chemistry of a soil or food specimen between the opposite poles of lime and silica. I have found that using radionics to apply biodynamic preparation patterns produces some of the finest chromatograms I have seen, and I intend in future articles to show a variety of these pictures so readers can form their own opinions.

In the final analysis, why do I like radionics? It is easy, accurate, effective, swift and sure. Using a map I can pattern my whole property with whichever biodynamic preparation or preparations I need at the moment, and I can put the preparation patterns for current conditions into foliar or fertigation applications. For example, radionics allows me to compensate for too much rain by applying the Oak Bark preparation (BD 505) in tandem with the Horsetail preparation (BD 508) whenever things go from excessively dry to excessively wet all of a sudden. And I really like it that I don’t have to set foot in soggy paddocks and I can apply the patterns I want at any time of the day or night. I can also use radionics to moderate such problems as weeds, or animal infestations, and it seems extremely useful in plant breeding as well. Dealing with animal ailments is simplicity itself, and I can use virtually any homeopathic in the repertory. Even better, when I can’t afford to apply physical amendments with something expensive like molybdenum or kelp I can reduce the physical application to one part in a thousandth and use radionics to get good response. 

Actually I only know a fraction of the things I can do with radionics, and because it is so easy to use I find myself applying my biodynamic preparations in far more instances than were ever possible stirring the raw preps. In the process I have learned to intimately appreciate what each one does and when best to apply it.

 

Peter Escher


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Back when I started farming, my first biodynamic mentor was Peter Escher,

Ehrenfried Pfeiffer’s partner in setting up his laboratories at Threefold Farm in Spring Valley, New York. Pfeiffer was Rudolf Steiner’s right-hand man in his agricultural work, and was devoted to carrying out Steiner’s wish that we apply the benefits of our biodynamic preparations to the widest possible areas of the entire earth. Clearly Peter had also devoted his life to this task, and I was deeply touched by his hope that somehow something of Steiner’s gift to humanity would succeed in bearing fruit for the greater good. 

By the time I met him in 1977, Peter was a very old man with an immense sense of urgency about him. As I got to know him, this urgency came across to me as a palpable sense of relief that from time to time I got his teachings in one or two goes. Sometimes I think I am incredibly stupid—but on the occasions when I worked with Peter there was a mystique about the old man that inspired me. I was really keen to grasp what he told me with all my heart, knowing that Peter himself was a gift and an answer to my solemnest prayers.

 

Life Runs Up/Death Runs Down

 

Rudolf Steiner gave the insights of his Agriculture Course and his indications for making remedies to re-enliven the earth out of an understanding of syntropy and how it makes things increasingly more and more alive. This task of re-enlivening the earth is what biodynamic preparations are meant to do. The more they are used, the more they make our land and our crops thrive. Steiner hoped to reverse the situation where selfish, deluded, insecure people are wringing the life out of the world. His agriculture course was his final, desperate effort to introduce a new impulse toward syntropy. Otherwise he foresaw that soon the earth would no longer be able to support life.. 

Both Pfeiffer and Escher saw that our most important task was to apply the benefits of the biodynamic preparations to the widest possible areas of the entire earth for its healing. The philosophy will catch up later after we reverse the trend toward selfishness and death. The urgency of this mission implies we must apply the preps as quickly as possible in whatever form we can—and Steiner encouraged innovation. Steiner believed that improved nutrition was the fundamental factor that would overcome the main inner hindrances of personal ambition, illusions and petty jealousies.

In one of our discussions, Peter Escher pointed out to me that it was the demons who first recognised Christ for what and who he was. He noted that those opposed to human progress are always at the forefront of stifling and stymieing any impulses to the good. He pointed out that the biodynamic movement was never immune to this. 

When Pfeiffer got his laboratories working he manufactured and distributed two biodynamic preparation products—Dr. Pfeiffer’s Quick Composting Compound and Dr. Pfeiffer’s Field Spray. This was met with furious condemnation by those who held that no one could or should use Steiner’s agricultural remedies who was not devoted to Anthroposophy with a capital “A”. Had Pfeiffer bowed to this pressure, Steiner’s task of applying the preparations to the widest possible areas would have been stymied.

Not at all strangely, though Peter and I talked about many things that can only be described as spiritual, we never had any conversations about Anthroposophy. However, with my love of language I looked this term up in my Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary. I don’t know who writes diectionaries, but there is deep wisdom in the definitions of words. Webster’s gave two definitions of anthroposophy: 1. The study of human wisdom; and 2. A cult based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner. While I don’t know when I was not engaged in anthroposophy of the first sort, the second definition would not have applied to Rudolf Steiner himself. 

 

Boiling It Down

 

I reckon what it comes down to is the world has always had two kinds of people on board. One set believes in taking whatever they can for themselves at the expense of others and the world, thus aggrandizing and enriching themselves while forcing others into insignificance and poverty. Their ideal of perfection is to force everyone besides themselves to conform to the lowest common denominators and pitting everyone against each other whilst they make off with the loot. Of course, they think they are special exceptions. This world view results in the earth running down to exhaustion and death. 

The other set of people believe in freely enriching the world around them and encouraging others to develop their gifts, whatever they may be. Thus their ideal of perfection is to promote diversity and cooperation, which by its dynamic nature enhances the world and humanity while creating abundance. Quite naturally this sort believes everyone is special. This world view would result in the world running up to greater and greater enhancement. 

It is no wonder that the first group has an easy time of exploiting the other. The first group automatically takes, the second gives. It is a match made in heaven— except domination by the takers over the givers results in a world of serial rape, pillage and oppression that runs down until it dies. Considering that our culture is dominated by the taker mentality, it is little wonder that the belief in entropy is so entrenched while it’s opposite, syntropy, is ridiculed. 

 

Can Do/Can’t Do

 

Many are those who prefer to enforce what cannot be done rather than nurturing what can be done. In the glossary of A Biodynamic Farm (ACRES, USA, 1994) I define good, evil and freedom in the hope of bringing clarity to some of these issues. Good is an adjective used to describe something or someone who brings about an increase in freedom and ability. On the other hand, Evil is a cause of limitation or harm. Freedom is the choice to, or not to, or the choice not to choose. Freedom cannot be either/or; it must be both/and; and it also includes the ability to choose not to make a choice. As long as one must either have freedom from or freedom to, one is under compulsion. One is even under compulsion if one is forced to make a choice. 

I don’t know of anyone using radionics as a biodynamic method who insists that radionic patterning is the only way or that biodynamics can be used. However, there are many like those who condemned Ehrenfried Pfeiffer and Peter Escher, that seemingly wish to limit biodynamics to an elite few who adhere to the methodology of stirring and spraying—even if this is only horn manure and horn silica once a year— while pretending they are truly doing what Rudolf Steiner recommended. If they could, they would hold biodynamics back to these limits as government and commercial policy—which shows which side of the divide they are on.  ≈    

 


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Ehrenfried Pfeiffer

 

 

 

 

 

Radionics vs. Mechanics

 

Radionics vs. Mechanics

 

By Hugh Lovel

 

Since it takes life to beget more life, my rule is to work with the living realm which pulses and breathes and where the driving force is ever further enhancement. Thus using stirring machines, tractors, pumps and spray gear doesn’t really inspire me that much. These are mechanical devices with no life of their own. Of course, I’ve used these aids—powerful electric motors with their EMF fields and lumbering diesel tractors belching fumes and compacting the soil. I guess I could have gone on to airplanes or helicopters, but I went down a different path, more vibratory and transcendental it seems to me. It also seems a more direct link to spiritual essence rather than physical presence, though in this world of ours there is never one without the other. This is the path of quantum non-locality and entanglement, though it usually is known by the somewhat older label of radionics, and what originally was an invention of T. Galen Hieronymus (1895–1988) that I have come to call field broadcasting. (also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hieronymus_machine )

I tend to put a premium on results, as theories and talk are cheap while results can be dear. And while I don’t discount quantity, quality is a must, and quality is not nearly so difficult to measure as some would have us believe. As a chef and chemist, I’d say taste and smell are the two best indicators of vital, nutritious food; and I’ve found the flavor and aroma of biodynamic foods grown with radionics to be unexcelled in complexity and integrity—two key signs of life. I might add, this is not simply my own experience. Those growers I know who have used radionics for any length of time seem to all have a similar experience.

There was a time when I couldn’t imagine how a radionic instrument might work with life energy. Although experience soon convinced me at the gut level that it must be true. But I had only a vague idea of how life energy worked or what it was. It took me years to sort this out, and it hardly helped that erroneous ideas are often bandied about like confetti at an Italian wedding. Life energy builds. It grows. It is organizational and works just the opposite of things that run down, disperse and are entropic. Life energy is syntropic.

One of the easiest of the erroneous notions about radionics to dispel is that it is electrical or electromagnetic. This notion commonly circulates amongst those who condemn radionics without investigation. I could as easily say that music works with electricity. After all you can listen to music with an electrical device, but when it comes down to it electricity runs down and disperses while life energy—even though it often follows the same pathways—does not. Life energy concentrates. The electricity bit, along with notions such as radionics must be working with underworld demons, is misleading and hysterical, and setting the record straight is long overdue.

 

Take Rain, For Example

 

When we see a cloud gather in the moisture of the atmosphere and build into a thunderstorm, it grows. First it starts with rising spirals of warm, moist air that push up into cooler, upper layers, spilling these downward while turning into puffs of white cloud. Then not only the warm, moist air feeds the fledgling cloud, but the light works on this cloud so that it percolates ever more strongly creating inner updrafts and outer downdrafts until these become so strong one wouldn’t want to fly a light plane too close. Of course, like all living things the cloud only builds so long before it reaches a point of such fecundity that we have lightning, which is a condensation of warmth ether, and thunder, which is a condensation of light ether—and we get rain. Unlike evaporation, which is the result of water dispersing, rain is the result of water becoming organized and concentrated. And as just about any farmer knows, the rain that falls in this fashion stimulates the growth of crops far more than water from the irrigation channel. After all, it is the result of life energy. It is rich in the forces of growth instead of dispersion.

Some would say that lightning is electricity, but is it? Well, certainly it has electrical effects associated with it, but as I just stated, lightning is a condensation of warmth, and those who have watched those late summer pyrotechnic displays of heat lightning should have a sense of what I mean. The more I studied lightning the more I realized the light part is organizational, although I’d have to say Rudolf Steiner caught the true essence of electricity when he called it fallen light ether. As such, electricity is disorganizational where light is organizational. There is an enormous difference. The dynamics of clouds and rain are complex and I won’t go into further detail at the moment, but I mention cloud formation in passing because it is such an obvious example of life energy. Life energy flows from lower concentration to higher concentration, which is what atmospheric moisture has to do for rain to occur.

 

What Is Radionics?

 

In the above example of rain I have used the term ether, as in warmth ether and light ether. Ether, in the sense the word was used by spiritual scientist, Rudolf Steiner (1861 – 1925), is life energy. It is organizational energy, which flows toward greater concentration. Three decades later when physicists were saying there was no ether, rather than argue, another Austrian scientist named Wilhelm Reich (1897 – 1957) called ether ‘orgone’ energy. This is what radionic instruments work with. A radionic instrument uses patterns of resistance to concentrate energy and create a flow from lower concentration to higher concentration. This pattern energy is radiant rather than static. It is flowing, moving and accumulating where resistance concentrates it; and the nature and variation of the resistance influences the etheric patterns.

The term radionics comes from the realization that everything, without exception, radiates its own characteristic pattern or wave form. Even a hydrogen atom could not exist without radiating according to its specific pattern. A radionic instrument can be anything which channels such patterns. My favorite radionic instrument is a piece of paper called a projection wheel, which has an iris pattern printed on it. This concentrates energy, and is often used with the popular Sri Sanjeevini radionic pattern cards that are printed on paper and are used daily by hundreds of thousands of people in India and throughout the world. Anyone interested can find these cards at:  http://www.saisanjeevini.org/cardshtm/b1_6.htm

Projection Wheel_0Projection Wheel  Projection Wheelsanjeevini cards1

sanjeevini cards2

                                                      Sanjeevini Cards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life and Death

 

When thinking about life I distinguish between lively health and vitality and barely scraping along on the threshold of oblivion. What I’m referring to is the difference between syntropy and entropy. Entropy is a process of dispersal, dissolution and death, while syntropy is a process of increasing order, complexity, organization and life. Life is syntropic insofar as it defies entropy, and the more strongly it does this the more alive it is. Death runs down while life runs up.

I realize that many in our culture believe that only entropy exists—yet, strangely, many of these same people believe in evolution. If there was only entropy an embryo would never become a child or a mature adult. DNA would have long ago lost its ability to heal itself or to find more complex expressions. Clouds would not gather moisture into themselves so strongly that it rains. Forests would never grow, and what we know as fertile soil would never have been built. In the words of Nobel Prize winning physicist, Erwin Schrödinger (1887 — 1961), “Living organisms have the remarkable ability to concentrate a stream of order on themselves.”

It is good to think in terms of life energy streaming, as one of our problems in recognizing life processes is their dynamic qualities rather than their quantitative measurements. Life needs to be measured qualitatively, not by weight or volume like boulders or parked trucks. Would any farmer deny that some soils and some farms are more alive than others even though they may be of similar size or other physical measures? Likewise some foods are far richer in vitality, flavor, balance and wholesomeness than others, even though they may measure pretty much the same in most ways—just look at honey and sugar, raw milk and boiled milk or fresh fruits and processed foods.

 

Patterns and Boundaries

 

As paper radionics illustrates, radionics is about patterns. Patterns define boundaries and boundaries give rise to order. Order provides organization, which is what makes living organisms alive. Think of organization as a process that arises at boundaries and is the basis of life. While energy disperses when boundaries are ruptured or lost, boundaries provide the containment for life energy to build. When a point is reached in the process where an organism dies and its boundaries and syntropic processes fail, it becomes entropic and starts breaking down. Natural scientist and poet, Johann W. von Goethe (1749 – 1832) argued that a butterfly specimen on display in a museum was not a butterfly at all. The being that was the butterfly had fled its containment. What was on display was merely its corpse on its way to dissolution.

The power of boundaries is so quintessential it tends to escape our notice, as we require concepts in order to see occurrences. When IBM mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot, using computers, mapped boundaries with the concept Z = Z2 + C he calculated trillions of values for Z—and discovered to his amazement layer after layer of complex forms, giving rise to a branch of mathematics known today as fractals. The Mandelbrot Set—which arises from the equation above—is a classic case of beautiful, organic forms arising from boundaries. Below is a link to download a Mandelbrot Set generator that can be entertaining to play with. http://wareseeker.com/free-mandelbrot-set-generator/

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Overview of the Mandelbrot Set (Z = Z2 + C) prior to magnification.

 

 

Dynamics

 

An important aspect of life is its dynamics. This goes beyond three dimensions as living organisms have length, breadth, height and continuity. I realize waves are often thought of and graphed as two dimensional, but are they really? Imagine that waves in three dimensions are vortices, and these vortices also have duration. Life involves more than three dimensions. Life processes have the nature of waves or oscillations, which change even as they endure. Any being that embodies life carries continuity within itself until the point this continuity flees its containment, at which point this containment ceases to be alive. Life pulses. It reaches and withdraws, engages and lets go.

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As long as its patterns resonate harmoniously, life energy builds. When life energy becomes dissonant the organism breaks up. Try looking at it this way:  If two boats are sailing across a body of water, separate from each other, they will create bow waves which will cross paths. Where the bow waves meet in phase, peak for peak and trough for trough, they double in size. Where they meet out of phase, and peaks meet troughs, they cancel each other. This same phenomenon occurs in homeopathy, which gets its name from treating like with like. The homeopath gives the patient a pattern that matches the condition the patient has— but with the pattern 180 degrees out of phase. When accomplished with precision this simply cancels the condition. Since radionics is a matter of vibratory patterns and their transfer, the same applies for radionics, only the patterns or frequencies can be transferred over any distance without loss because as patterns they are not local, they are universal. Radionics is simply used for pattern transfer.

In homeopathy what changes the phase of the pattern is the homeopathic potency, Some potencies may reinforce a condition while others may cancel it out. Moreover, if a desired pattern is absent, radionics can be used to establish it. A classic book about radionics is Virginia MacIvor and Sandra LaForest’s VIBRATIONS—Healing Through Color, Homeopathy and Radionics—published by Samuel Weiser, Inc. This book is a good read which went through at least ten printings and still can be found both new and used on the internet.

 

 

Prayer and Intent

 

Just as with prayer and intent, with radionics distance and time are irrelevant. Radionics is based on transfer of patterns that are mathematical and ideal, which means they are transcendental and not limited by space and time. These patterns can be transferred over any distance instantaneously with no loss of strength by a mathematical principle quantum physicists call Bell’s Theorem. Quantum physics also shows us that the observer is a determining factor, which means the observer influences what he observes. Likewise prayer and intent are choices we make and their patterns can influence the realities we live in and create as well. Although one sort of radionic instrument may use cards while another uses rates, both can use written intents. In some respects written intents are more powerful than cards or rates since they come directly from the human urge to transform things, particularly ourselves, into something more than we presently are. A farmer’s intent is the determining factor for what his farm becomes, and in this sense what he thinks he grows.

        

 

Intent cards for writing intents to be used as patterns. The card on the right contains an intent taken from Joey Korn’s book, Dowsing: A Path To Enlightenment.

 

The Instrument Is Not the Pattern

 

The mechanics of a radionic instrument affects the character of the patterns it transfers no more than the mechanics of a radio set affects the character of jazz or bluegrass music. As paper radionics shows, radionics simply conveys patterns over any distance without loss. There isn’t any transfer of matter or energy. Only the patterns which organize the matter and energy are transferred.

In terms of life or death the most important thing is whether the patterns are constructive and syntropic, like the biodynamic preparations, or destructive and entropic like alternating current electricity. Just as the drummer in the band sets the rhythm and the beat the others follow, it is the pattern aspect of the biodynamic preparations that draws life into the soil or into the air above it. BD prep patterns work with life processes, which is what makes them bio-dynamic. Lily Kolisko’s experiments, available in Agriculture of Tomorrow, demonstrate that the actual substances applied with biodynamics can be so slight as to be undetectable. Understandably people tend to be mystified by this if they focus on substance instead of dynamics, and in the past this has given biodynamics an unfortunate cult flavor.

 

Biodynamic Stirring

Stirring biodynamic preparations corresponds with potentization in both homeopathy and radionics, so I’d like to point out its considerable merits and let it be a matter of personal choice.

Let’s suppose I’m stirring something like horn silica in a 5 gallon bucket with my arm, or in a 55 gallon barrel with a stirring stick suspended from a swivel. First I stir round and round to create as strong a vortex as I can. When I do this the water separates and organizes itself in laminar layers so that the cooler, denser water moves to the middle and sinks while the warmer layers seek the edges and rise. The appearance is one of a spinning funnel, and the water has become organized and enlivened. Each time I develop a mature vortex, I then reverse and stir in the opposite direction. The water churns and froths with chaos until it forms into a new vortex. The chaos is important because life depends on organization flowing from virtually no organization toward higher and richer organization. Organization has to come from somewhere and it does this out of chaos.

Each time a new vortex is established a new generation of order is created in the water. When I reverse directions, again and again, back and forth for an hour, generation after generation after generation of order is built into the water, and the result is an evolution of order. This charges up the water with life energy and activates remedies beautifully. Then even a small droplet will be so rich in organization that it will continue to draw life force to itself once it is sprayed. This corresponds to a homeopathic potency for imparting patterns. It also carries human intentions and vibrations, and in the process the biodynamic remedies become vehicles for intent. This works a charm.

Nevertheless in today’s world a corresponding radionic patterning using biodynamic pattern cards and a map of a paddock or a farm is quick and easy and can be done morning and evening every day for months on end. Where a stir and spray event has a powerful initial effect which then fades, daily radionic patterning morning and evening gradually builds and builds.

 

The Edge Effect

 

Permaculturists often describe the pattern/boundary phenomenon as the edge effect, and the idea is to strive, insofar as possible, to maximize this edge effect in landscape design. This enriches the pattern density of an area and enlivens it. A palpable increase in the vitality of a landscape is observable as the edge effect intensifies, even though it is good to remember that vitality is measured qualitatively rather than quantitatively.

The human organism is a huge collection of boundaries and patterns from the outer boundaries of our skin, hair and nails to the double helix spirals of our DNA and the resonant wave patterns of our sub-atomic particles.

Since it took me a couple decades and several readings of Steiner’s Agriculture Course to understand how life processes arise out of chaos, I sympathize with anyone who struggles to gain familiarity with this concept. In our culture today we’ve been taught that life is some kind of absolute that cannot be evaluated—something is either alive or it isn’t. From this point of view a person on life support is fully alive—until he isn’t. Of course, we can generally tell when the life essence has fully departed, as the corpse left behind decomposes. But how can we ignore the difference between a tree in its prime and growing well and a tree that is hollow, rotten and riddled with termites? How can we pretend that each embody the same degree of aliveness?

 

Comparisons

 

It might give rise to ill-feeling to compare the vitality of our farm with our neighbors’. In the first place we’d do better comparing our paddocks to the roadside, since the roadside is more likely to be doing whatever the natural potential of the land is if left unfarmed. The paddocks we farmed before we gained insight into building carbon and life into the land may have been flogged almost to oblivion and just barely scraping by. Showing how our own paddocks are less flogged than someone else’s is hardly an answer to raising the game of the neighborhood to nature’s level and beyond. And we should be thinking about achieving the beyond part. All too often our fence rows and roadsides are drawing life from the cosmos and supporting our paddocks. If we only farmed restoratively our paddocks would be drawing carbon and nitrogen out of the air and life out of the cosmos. Then our farms would be feeding the roadsides and enlivening the entire earth.   

I believe when we compare stirring and spraying BD preps with radionic patterning we miss the point. The two are different approaches though both build life into the environment. It must be said that applying dynamic patterns via radionics is a Godsend. I would never have gained a hundredth as much experience with biodynamics if radionics wasn’t so quick and easy. To the consternation of critics, radionics encourages frequent and precise use of the biodynamic remedies, and growers using radionics learn a lot.

Of course stirring and spraying BD preps provides people—myself included—with am empathic and meditative modality that invites people to pour their souls into what they spray on their paddocks, and nature really responds to feelings. When we stir and spray with deep, heartfelt gratitude, nature responds wonderfully—so much so that I recommend feeling deep gratitude with radionics as well. But comparing stirring and radionics is like comparing peanuts with watermelons. Why would I only have one when I could have both? It makes sense to stir and spray my seed potatoes or around my field broadcaster.

                                  Biodynamic Pattern Cards from Australian Herbs

 

Pattern Cards

 

            The type of radionic card shown above was originally introduced by Malcolm Rae (1913 –1979), an early radionic pioneer. The design is more than symbolic as the rings provide boundaries, which give rise to organization and life. The sector marks within the circles provide resistance, which concentrates life energy according to each pattern. Since life energy flows to wherever it is most concentrated, it flows through the marks on the cards. These Malcolm Rae type cards are excellent for use with a paper projection wheel.

            Of course, more sophisticated radionic instruments offer advantages over paper radionics. I like the card type instrument, which was pioneered by Malcolm Rae. Below is a picture of the Japanese made Iyachiko instrument which features energy accumulators with both card readers and plates. The plates come in handy for materials if there are no corresponding cards, and the 0 to 999 potentiometers provide a complete range of homeopathic potencies. The sacred geometric proportions feel natural and organic, and the instrument has storage inside its lid for cards and other bits as well as protecting against dust or damage. A lead from the instrument can be used to transfer patterns into spray tanks, irrigation systems and liquid products such as compost teas, activated EM brews or foliar and fertigation products, while the well is useful for maps or other targets. Most importantly—since the essence of control is to use the exact amount of force necessary and no more or no less—the Iyachiko includes a timer and can automatically shut itself off instead of requiring the operator to come in from some remote paddock to shut the instrument off when pattern transfer is accomplished.

                  Japanese made Iyachiko

 

Polarity and Balance

 

            Finally, polarity and balance are hugely important, and radionics has the potential of being very helpful with this. Steiner envisioned that if the biodynamic preparations were in widespread use all over the world they would bring a new impulse to our planet by providing human beings with the balanced life forces needed to rein in our personal ambitions, illusions and petty jealousies and ground ourselves. And yet, biodynamic growers themselves sometimes have little to show in terms of spiritual progress. Why is this?

Steiner pointed out that nature’s polarities are lime and silica, while clay mediates between these poles. He described lime as a grasping fellow while silica is an open, generous aristocrat. Neither extreme is integrated without clay, which he characterized as allying itself with silica.

Unfortunately the majority of BD growers in the world—especially the conventional ones—use the lime polarity horn manure far more than they use its opposite, horn silica. Moreover, many do nothing whatsoever in regard to clay. US preparation maker, Hugh Courtney, has been emphasizing the need to balance the application of horn manure (500) with horn silica (501) for nigh on 30 years, but he admits the message doesn’t seem to get across as preparation sales of 500 far outstrip the 501. “When they don’t have 501, how can they put it on?” He worries.

It is easy to see how this situation developed, and once developed how it perpetuated itself. It takes a lot of doing to stir and spray 3 or 4 gallons per acre of horn manure with large fields to cover. Even a market garden operation would have to spend three or four hours extra of an evening to stir and spray horn manure. To get up early the next day and spend another three or four hours stirring and spraying horn silica, to maintain optimum balance, is a big task.

As for clay, adding horn clay or esophageal clay to the horn manure and horn silica is not much extra, but the clay preparations were developed after Steiner’s death, which means they are not used in the more traditional operations. This ensures that most biodynamic farms grow food that does not fully accomplish what Steiner intended. It may taste better than the ordinary and be more nutritious simply because so much horn manure was used, but lest we forget, lime is a grasping fellow. We have an exceedingly greedy culture already, in part because silica is widely ignored while lime is used extensively and clay not at all. I was as guilty of this as anyone in my early days of farming, and radionics was very helpful in correcting these imbalances on my farm.

 

      

 

Hugh Lovel and Adam Collins setting up an array of radionic instruments to improve atmospheric organization and the chances of rain at Albury, NSW after the fires in February 2003. One of the instruments shown was a variable capacitance Kelly instrument made in Lakemont, Georgia.

 

 

Why Use Radionics and Field Broadcasting?

 

They not only work with life energy, they are cheap, easy, accurate, effective, swift and sure. Using a map as the link, I can pattern my whole property with whichever biodynamic preparation or preparations I need at any given time, and I can apply whatever preparation patterns I currently need to enhance my foliar or fertigation applications. If I wake up in the middle of the night to a sudden transition from dry to wet conditions I can quickly compensate for the shift within minutes without leaving the house by radionically applying the Oak Bark preparation (BD 505) in tandem or in concert with the Horsetail preparation (BD 508). This sops up the flush of nitrates released by the rain while strengthening silica to avoid weak, watery growth. Radionics makes a hard life easier and I don’t have to set foot in soggy paddocks. I can also moderate weeds or insect invasions, and I use it in plant breeding as well. Dealing with animal ailments is simple, and I can use any homeopathic remedy in the repertory. Even better, when I can’t afford to apply physical amendments with something expensive like molybdenum or kelp I can reduce the physical application to one part in a thousandth (3x) and use radionics to get a brilliant response.

 

 

Using an Australian made Prue Instrument to impart Horn Manure and Cow Pat Pit to a farm property via a map. Although the instrument itself is no more alive than a bucket or spray rig, the dynamic pattern it transmits is the essence of life itself.

 

Actually I only know a fraction of the things I can do with radionics, but I have to admit because it is so easy to use I find myself applying my biodynamic preparations in far more instances than were ever possible stirring the raw preps. In the process I have learned to appreciate what each preparation does and when best to apply it.

 

 

 

 

Definition of Biodynamics

WHAT IS BIODYNAMIC AGRICULTURE?

 

BIODYNAMIC AXGRICULTURE:  Bio (life) dynamic (processes); Biodynamic agriculture involves working with life processes.

This does not mean physical substance or chemistry are ignored. The biodynamic approach to agriculture emphasizes life processes which have potent organisational (syntropic) effects to engage minerals and chemical reactions. The use of what are called ‘biodynamic preparations’ establishes, increases and enhances life processes. The question is, what is a LIFE process and what are the life processes we are talking about?

Nineteenth and twentieth century physics focused on life-LESS processes. With these energy flowed from higher concentration to lower concentration, as without life all energy flows from order toward chaos in a process called entropy. However, it became recognised in the mid twentieth century that order also arises out of chaos. It does this cyclically at boundaries or surfaces, which means energy flows from lower to higher concentration over time periods that begin and end in a process called syntropy. Life processes are syntropic, and a variety of these can be distinguished in regard to plants, so let’s look at what these are.

In the soil, the processes involved in life are mineral release, nitrogen fixation, digestion and nutrient uptake. These are related to the lime complex commonly referred to as the CEC or as cations. Because biodynamics comes from an awareness of the influences of the context on life processes, these processes are correlated with the planets between the sun and the earth, namely mercury, venus and the moon.

However, plants live both in the soil AND the atmosphere, and in the atmosphere the processes are quite different and complimentary to the soil processes. What goes on in the atmosphere is photosynthesis, blossoming, fruiting and ripening. These processes are related to silica and to the planets beyond the sun and the earth, namely mars, Jupiter and Saturn.

In large part, biodynamics involves getting a dynamic interplay going between what goes on above ground and what goes on below.

Plants draw in energy and carbon—the basis of life—via photosynthesis. By doing so, they build up sugars and carbohydrates in their sap during the day and a portion of this drains down to plants’ root tips and are exuded into the soil around the tender young root growth of the plant. This feeds a honey-like syrup to the soil foodweb which uses the energy to release minerals such as silica, lime and phosphorous along with various trace mineral co-factors that provide for nitrogen fixation.

Nitrogen fixation is VERY energy intensive as it takes roughly 10 units of sugar to fix one unit of amino acid. Moreover, nitrogen fixing microbes don’t just gift the nitrogen they fix to plants. However, protozoa and other soil animal life eat mineral releasing and nitrogen fixing microbes, thus excreting a steady stream of freshly digested milk-like nourishment rich in amino acids and minerals chelates, which the plant takes up from the soil. This milk-like nourishment is the basis for chlorophyll assembly in the leaf and for the duplication of the DNA and the protein chemistry basic to plant growth.

From the biodynamic point of view it is enormously important that the soluble salt levels in the soil are as low as possible while the insoluble but available nutrients stored in humus are abundant. Partly this is because when the plant takes up amino acids instead of nitrogen salts the efficiency of the plant chemistry is dramatically increased and photosynthetic efficiency is multiplied. Also, soluble salts in the soil are toxic to the nitrogen fixing and mineral releasing micro-life in the soil as soluble salts amount to their waste, in which case they shut down and fail to function as might be expected of any organism which had to live in its own waste.

Making Rain

The Dallas/Austin Drive and RAIN

 

Shabari and I flew in to Georgia from Australia and after less than a week of settling in at Bird’s Nest, planting gardens and preparing for the Weston A. Price convention we drove out to Dallas. The Weston A. Price convention was awesome with something like 1,500 attendees and luminaries like Jerry Brunetti and Michael Schmidt—just to mention two—presenting.

Jerry, a livestock nutritionist and farm advisor, healed himself from advanced type B lymphoma with nutrition, while Michael, a gentle and perceptive biodynamic dairy farmer of immense dedication has spearheaded the raw milk movement in Canada at the pointy end of government suppression. In particular, Dr. Mercola was a vibrant presence that resonated with me, as he related his path to learning was paved—like my own—by learning how to learn. What an awesome presence and presentation! To get a better taste of what went on there at the Dallas Sheraton—the largest convention hotel in Texas and largest Sheraton in the world—you’ll probably have to surf the internet.

However, Shabari and I were concerned about the drought that had afflicted Texas—particularly since January 2011, but also over the last few years—and she made contact with Steve Diver, Gary Freeborg, Coleman Kelly, Bill McCrainy and others she knew or knew of that were involved with biodynamic agriculture in the Austin area where they hadn’t had a decent rain event in eleven months and were in what looked like a historical dry cycle.

For whatever reasons, Shabari and I have independently studied weather and rain cycles from a wide range of similar viewpoints and we were aware that sequential application of the biodynamic preparations has a history of breaking droughts and bringing into the areas where these preparations are applied whatever is needed for life to thrive. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways. So in the Austin area we visited farms where I set up a couple of field broadcasters to broadcast preparation patterns. We also had classes at the Casa de Luz where I described what was happening with biodynamics and biodynamic preparations and got some things going with applications of biodynamic preparations in a variety of locations. Steve Diver and Bill McCrainy were especially helpful in getting stirring and spraying of BD preps going on the ground in a couple different locations, and Seaton Collard took on radionic applications of the sequential sprays as well. So far the result has been, you guessed it, rain within 24 hours of the first application for the greater Austin area.

There’s a lot more to the story, of course. It’s all about life forces and MODERATE rain rather than devastating rain, because when things are healthy is when life forces are cooking and balanced and rain occurs in CYCLES so you don’t get either too much or too little. In actual fact it is easier to get tired of too much rain as compared to too little. It’s easier to survive a drought than a flood, as long as neither one is too extreme. This sequential spray procedure, developed chiefly by Hugh Courtney (Josephine Porter Institute of Applied Biodynamics) with key input from Harvey Lisle and support by yours truly, Hugh Lovel, makes that happen in an organic, life supporting way. If you want to know more, get involved with sequential spraying of the biodynamic preparations and study what happens. It undoubtedly will help to explore our website and take courses, download content, but above all get involved with applying the preparations. There’s a lot of information out there to corroborate what’s on our website and by all means do wider searches.

Soil Fertility: How to achieve; more discussion on Boron and other minerals; Biodynamic application

 

Re: boron application w/ prep. 500 or 501/Too much boron?

 

Dear Michael,

I need to thank you for correcting my mistake in treating borax the same as solubor. That was a mistake and I acknowledge it.

 

I like your idea of lacing the horn preparations—particularly horn clay if you make that—with a trace of boron. I like to dilute to 3x or one part in a thousand and adding modest amounts depending on how many horns I’m burying.

 

I also acknowledge your pioneering stature in popularizing the re-mineralization of soils, but even though you may be a leader it is a bit puzzling that you seem to think you are out front of the entire pack. My first acquaintance with cutting edge soil science was in 1976 with Carey Reams, who lived about 30 miles away from me in Georgia. Surely you’ve heard of him. Arden Anderson, Dan Skow, Phil Wheeler and Bob Pike, to name a few, were all Reams students. But the first soil remediation formulas I was satisfied with that addressed optimizing sulphur, boron, copper, zinc, manganese, moly, cobalt, etc. were in the eighties with Agronics, Inc. out of Albuquerque, NM. They were using A & L Labs out of Lubbock, TX and mixing major and minor nutrients into leonardite mined in Cuba, NM. I visited their mining and blending operations. They sold these fertiliser mixes to farmers by tractor trailer loads, each load tailored to specific needs as identified by soil testing. I had, of course, encountered Neal Kinsey’s approach, and he was targeting boron and all the traces as well, but he wasn’t feeding the soil’s biology the way Agronics was and his approach didn’t make as much sense to me—though I’ve seen it get impressive results in state of the art trials covering 100,000 acres of citrus in Florida. But despite Kinsey’s track record, I had taken soil microbiology as part of my biochemistry curriculum, so I couldn’t think of the soil simply in terms of minerals when I knew how important the biology was. By the ‘90s I had learned to make good compost and add deficient minerals after many experiments making poor compost, bad compost and some reasonably good composts, and I was always chasing that biodynamic ideal of self-sufficiency in fertility. I wasn’t inclined to fool myself with mediocre results. I used boron (as borax at 5lbs/acre for a single application) and other trace mineral supplements from my second year onward as I started farming on a very impoverished soil. Over the past 37 years I’ve seen a variety of approaches, and here in Australia the approach Graeme Sait (Nutri-Tech) uses has been my standard. Graeme has been an early adopter of a wide variety of things, and one of them was my advice in 2000 of making silicon standard on all his soil tests. It was Graeme who taught me that humic acid was great for delivering boron to the soil foodweb and ensuring its uptake by plants. He promotes the use of a product that is granular humates (85% soluble) to which 10% boric acid has been incorporated. At 25 kg/ha this delivers a 0.2 ppm adjustment to boron levels in the soil, and I’ve seen many examples where zucchinis cucumbers, soybeans, etc. can be damaged in their initial sprouting stage at higher rates than this. But 0.2 ppm isn’t much of a correction for a soil that has only 0.3 ppm (or less) boron to begin with. It would be okay for grassy species like perennial ryegrass, sorghum or sugar cane but it won’t cut it with clover, brassicas, cucurbits or beans. For broadleaf species, and especially legumes, 1 ppm is the lower limit of adequacy. So for those crops, which would be damaged as seedlings by a 0.2 ppm adjustment delivered via humic acids, have to be side dressed by an additional application or two prior to flowering—once their transport system is big enough to take the additional sap pressure. So horticultural growers can put it on via fertigation, and broadacre or pasture growers may have to boom spray or fly it on, but the results can be impressive. And they will be just as impressive in a small garden if applied at this rate with a 0.2 ppm adjustment each time.

 

Perhaps It needs emphasis that in agriculture if a little bit is good, a little less more frequently is better. I also favour the belief that every soil is different—I see it every day.

 

I don’t know where you get the idea that most of my work is with radionics, but I find radionics is pretty hit and miss when soil biology and trace elements are weak. Radionics works with life, and if what you’re working with is barely alive radionics isn’t going to work very well—or at least nowhere near as well as when one gets the minerals and biology right. I just came back from a tour of dairy farms in western Victoria and South Australia—two dairy farms per day for 10 days. These were herds of anywhere between 300 and 700 milkers and the best one—who had been on the biological path for 4 years—was about 40% of the way to top results. He had pH 5.7, 10% organic matter with a Total Exchange Capacity of 44.21, and was massively calcium deficient at 4741 ppm Ca (Mehlich III) when his target was 6190 ppm. I use the rule of thumb that 250 kg/ha delivers the per cent analysis in ppm to the field, so at 35% Ca lime he would need over 10 metric tonnes of lime. Actually his total test showed 5734 Ca so some of it was not releasing and probably was held as a chelate in the humic fraction of the soil. But 10 tonnes is out of the question anyway. I never recommend over 4 T/Ha in one dose. He was also in excess for both magnesium and sodium, but the real story was his deficiencies in sulphur, phosphorous, manganese, copper and zinc. According to the Mehlich III test, which you prefer and I do too, potassium was deficient, but he had a huge reserve in his totals—far and away more than needed, and I’ve found that when phosphorous is working at luxury levels the soil microbes release potassium quite nicely from reserves.

 

We walked everywhere and dug up sod in several places. I showed him the visual signs of zinc, copper, manganese, sulphur and phosphorous deficiencies, while his silicon levels were unusually good at 76 ppm and boron was at 3 ppm. My target for luxury silicon is 100 ppm and boron at 3 ppm, but 76 ppm was good enough with 3 ppm boron that all the regrowth around the most recent cow pies (grazed 15 days prior) was erect instead of lodged and matted. That made him the best of the 20 farms as all the others showed signs of silicon deficiency in rampant and matted grass around manure patches. To put this into perspective, the others were only 30% or 25% or even less in turning around their pastures. Even so there were places where his clover leaves were the size of lentils instead of silver dollars (zinc deficiency), places where his ryegrass was rusty (copper deficiency) places where leaf mottling suggested manganese deficiency and so forth. One thing he did not show at 3 ppm boron was boron deficiency. All his clovers were solid stem—which is just about never seen where inputs such as urea are used. It’s not so easy to tell with grasses, but his dandelions, chicories, plantains, etc. showed no signs of boron deficiency.

 

According to your rule he should have had somewhere around 5 ppm B—so I disagree with your rule. I have seen 5 ppm B in bananas, and they set an extra 3 hands of bananas per bell with larger bananas. But bananas are an extremely large, siliceous plant that can use a lot of sap pressure. But if I was planting suckers in a new paddock I’m pretty sure 5 ppm B would be excessive as I’ve burned new plantings before with using an excess of boron humates—not seriously. They lived and grew out of it, but I should have been more careful. We can always add a bit more, but too much is hard to remedy.

 

I had others with heavier soils with more boron (e.g. pH 6.2, 9% organic matter, TEC 56, 4873 ppm Ca, 4 ppm B), but I’d say the soil cited above was fairly representative of the dairy soils in this group of about 45 tests. I don’t mean to imply that these dairy soils are anything like broadacre or horticultural soils though. Dairy pastures build high organic matter and potentially rich soils. I’ve seen as high as 22% organic matter. Ordinarily boron leaches along with nitrates, and this usually means that their effluent ponds are rich in both nitrates and boron. So when they are recycling their effluent on their paddocks they tend to build luxury levels of boron, which are almost never seen elsewhere unless the soil is a collection point for minerals leaching from other places. However, I had one organic fruit grower who was putting boron on routinely and it was leaching along with nitrates (because he was an organic NPK farmer who used poorly composted raw manure) and it went down about 2 feet to where he had a heavy clay layer and built up there. All his older trees were getting their roots stuck into it and overdosing on boron. Too much sap pressure and the bark split and the trees died.

 

Please feel free to ignore my advice if you think I’m just a dabbler in soils that would prefer to fix everything with biodynamic preparations and radionics. You can also ignore my research into the biochemical activity of boron in the xylem cells of plants. I don’t know where you got the idea that I’m so full of baloney, but if it suits you, go for it.

 

My advice isn’t just for you, though. I gave it because I thought you might be oversimplifying things and being incautious in your use of boron. Like Jerry Brunetti I don’t take others’ target levels as gospel. I set my own when I see in the plants the signs of less than optimal performance. There are always deficiency signs for silicon, calcium, manganese, copper, etc. and that includes boron. I’ve seen a lot of people who think 1 ppm B is enough for any soil, but I’d be one of the first to agree with you that more is often needed. The Incitec/Pivot soil tests here in Australia say that 0.2 to 0.4 ppm B is sufficient, but I’m sure you’re right in setting the bar higher; and in high pH soils (above 7.0) a little extra boron is strongly advisable. The same goes for high moly soils, they require a fair bit of extra copper, and instead of 5 ppm Cu, which I like for good grass and clovers, I like to see 7 ppm or even 9 ppm or more copper depending on how excessive the Mo is. These things are all variable and their interactions have to be considered. Some of us cannot afford to be incautious. I doubt if any home gardeners are going to sue you for giving them bad advice, but that isn’t the case when you are working with 1000 hectare (2500 acre) farms. Incitec/Pivot made a very costly mistake that was in the news a few years back. It seems a yard foreman told a somewhat green worker to put a bucket full of molybdenum in a fertiliser blend, and the worker thought that meant a front end loader bucket instead of a 20 litre bucket. It got blended and went out on a big farm and the result was a multi-million dollar lawsuit. Incitec is a big company so they swallowed the loss, but it goes to show you. When I recommend a siliceous rock dust, for example basalt or granite, I get the quarry tested first. One basalt had over 8% P, which was a bit of a surprise. But it also had about 7% manganese and more than 5 T/Ha would be enough to seriously depress Iron on a light soil and make it marginally available—not something I’d want to be careless about.

Best wishes,

Hugh Lovel

How To Make Rain 2012

            “A living organism has the astonishing gift of concentrating a ‘stream of order’ on itself, thus escaping the decay into atomic chaos.” –Erwin Schrödinger

            “It is the anomalies in nature that reveal the principles of life.” –Goethe

 

Enriching the Atmosphere By Hugh Lovel

 

My experience over the last 25 years shows it is possible to restore order to the atmosphere, a pre-requisite for rain. This could be an important part of returning farmers to self-sufficiency, and the methods— biodynamic sequential spraying, and/or radionic treatments with biodynamic reagents in combinations with color, sound and intents—are cheap and within the ability of most farmers to accomplish with relatively simple equipment. Only the know-how is lacking.

Weather is always changing, though it follows a pattern that oscillates back and forth within limits. Whenever it gets too hot and/or too dry it self-corrects to become cooler or wetter or both. However, this oscillation has obscure trigger points. MIT mathematician Edward Lorentz made this discovery in the mid ‘50s, giving rise to Chaos Theory. Chaos is a fact, but theory seeks to explain how it gives rise to order. Water evaporates, chaotically into the atmosphere. What makes it concentrate in clouds so dense they drop rain in certain places and at certain times—but not others?

 

The Stewardship of Rain

 

Often there is plenty of moisture in the air but no rain. Particularly in the southeastern USA the humidity can be 95% along with 95℉ without a cloud in the sky. In such conditions I can’t seem to draw much vitality from the atmosphere because it has so little. It is significantly worse in urban areas such as Atlanta, Georgia where summer thundershowers move across from western Douglas County, break up, go around urban Fulton and DeKalb counties, and resume their rain pattern in eastern Rockdale County. The traffic and industrial fumes that repel moisture and fuel the urban haze only abate on the weekends where weather statistics show 20% greater chances of rain on the family barbecue than on the weekday commute. What are we doing?

Global weather is a complicated self-correcting system. There is debate about the causes of global warming, but one thing is certain—global temperatures have risen. Polar icecaps show accelerated melting, especially in the northern hemisphere, and many glaciers world-wide are disappearing. Most importantly the temperatures of equatorial oceans show gains of roughly half a degree Celsius over the last 50 or so years, and heat drives the world’s weather because evaporation from the equatorial oceans puts the moisture into the atmosphere that fuels storms.

Roughly 89.5 billion acres of the earth’s surface is covered by water, and an acre-inch of water is 193,460 gallons. This means if evaporation was constant at merely an inch a year, rather than an inch or so a month, this would amount to 17.3 quadrillion gallons of water per year. That is 17.3 million billion gallons of water. Even a slight rise in the temperature of equatorial oceans means millions upon millions more gallons of water rise into the atmosphere. No one is sure exactly how much, but it all has to fall somewhere. Wherever moderate rainfall becomes scarcer and scarcer because ground cover is lost or pollution increases, floods become more common a few hundred miles away. Droughts in Chad, Sudan and Somalia correspond with floods in Mozambique and Tanzania. Droughts in Siberia are related to floods in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Alternatively, droughts in the Indus and Ganges watersheds produce floods along the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers. Drought in North America is accompanied by floods from the UK to Russia. If we reversed the conditions that lead to drought—such as bare soil and pollution—we would restore order to the atmosphere and return to normal rainfall while preventing floods. This would be an act of environmental responsibility.

 

Background

 

As earth and sky interact, we cannot revitalize the atmosphere without revitalizing the soil—in which case we should consider how wrongly most soils are fertilized. According to Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary a fertilizer is any substance that when applied to the soil makes it more fertile. However, the Fertilizer Institute and the industries behind them have secured the passage of laws requiring fertilizers to be soluble. Though the industry’s agenda is transparent, good sense says we don’t want our nutrients to be soluble, we want them to be insoluble but available—which is what occurs when the nutrients are stored and retained by the life of the soil. Then, by the teeming symbiosis characteristic of healthy soil, sufficient nutrients for robust crop production will be steadily available and the soil will be truly fertile.

Under present laws lime and other rock dusts must be advertised as soil amendments rather than fertilizers. Balanced, well-humified compost, which is even more crucial to building soil fertility, also is classified as an amendment rather than a fertilizer, as most of its nutrients are insoluble though available. On the other hand the massive use of soluble nitrogen ‘fertilizers’ such as anhydrous ammonia, urea or nitrates is like intoxicating oneself on a diet of amphetamines and ignoring healthy, balanced nutrition. Then everything goes like the clappers—until at some point it doesn’t go very well at all. Resting strong soils may return them to productivity, but eventually the collapse will be fatal if irresponsible soil practices don’t change. Obviously building soil biology and eliminating reliance on poisons would help the atmosphere immeasurably. There is a science to this. It can be done, but given the inertia of the present system it won’t be done soon. It may take massive losses in the agricultural sector for these changes to occur. In the interim what can we—who want to protect ourselves and moderate the damage—do?

 

Sequential Spraying

 

In the late 80s Hugh Courtney of the Josephine Porter Institute in Woolwine, VA was experimenting with applying the entire array of biodynamic preparations in close conjunction with each other. At a biodynamic conference on my farm we followed a sequence of evening barrel compound (BC), morning horsetail decoction (BD 508), evening horn manure (BD 500) and morning horn silica (BD 501), —thus applying all the preps Rudolf Steiner introduced in his Agriculture Course over a two day period. Courtney called it an energy balancing procedure, which he tested on his farm in Woolwine, Virginia and introduced at workshops in various parts of the country.

Hugh Courtney also suggested following up the prep sequence with milk and honey. Having a land flowing with milk and honey is a Biblical idea that implies a countryside rich in nourishment for the whole human being, both physically and spiritually. Since milk is related to calcium and the soil, the milk potency should be sprayed in the evening on the soil. As for honey, it is related to the silica activities of the daytime and should be sprayed in the air in the morning.

 

Further Experiments

 

During the late 80s, 90s and early 00s there were repeated summer droughts in the American Southeast, but wherever this sequence was employed at least technical precipitation if not outright rain followed within 72 hours. Hugh Courtney explained this as the ability of the BD preps to attract whatever was needed, and his experiments indicated that best success with making rain was likely if the sequence began in a water constellation and was completed just prior to full moon when watery forces were strongest.

Early on in the development of this procedure I started using radionics as an application of the axiom of fluid dynamics—often called the butterfly effect—that a microscopic change at a point can effect large scale changes in the medium. With an aerial map of my farm as my witness, I used my double-dial Hieronymus variable capacitance instrument with vials of the various preps as reagents along with double-dial rates that I obtained by cold scanning. I alternated applications while I fixed supper with applications when I fixed breakfast, dowsing for the duration of each application and using a timer in the circuit that would shut off the instrument while I was out at work on the farm or elsewhere. For the most part I was successful in getting timely rainfall even when the rest of Georgia was experiencing drought. On challenging occasions I learned to use color beamed into the instrument’s witness well,  along with herbal and mineral reagents, and I even used pictures and played recordings of rain—and whale songs, such exuberance!—along with my radionic programs. I became so confident of getting rain when I needed it that I gave my irrigation equipment away.

I also learned to use Malcolm Rae type equipment with cards for the biodynamic preparation patterns along with an interrupter in the circuit that turned the instrument on and off hundreds of times a minute to create the effect of myriad butterflys flapping their infinitessimal corrections rather than creating a single one off event. In 2005 I purchased a Power Radionic program for my computer from a dealer in HSCTI products in Woodstock, Georgia, ( http://www.hscti.net/index.html ) and with that I ran radionic programs on my computer—which opened up even further options.

In November, 2011 my wife, Shabari, and I flew in from Australia for the Weston A. Price convention in Dallas, TX and were shocked to see the devastation of the previous 10 months of drought. We organised a series of workshops in the Austin area focusing on sequential spraying and within the week most of the participants were rewarded by rain. But we know how much enthusiasm and diligence it takes to keep something like this going, and how easy it can be to lose confidence in the beginning. The tricks of the trade are myriad, and we share many of these on our RAIN CD, available from our website at www.quantumagriculture.com . We expect to be at the ACRES Convention in December.

 

 

Hugh Lovel and his wife, Shabari Bird Lovel live in Australia though they spend their northern winter months in Blairsville, Georgia where they hold a six day advanced course in Quantum Agriculture in early February. Shabari can be contacted at shabaribird@gmail.com and Hugh at hugh.lovel9@bigpond.com .

 

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Sidebar One:

 

Sequential Spraying—adapted from Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993).

 

In advance of each stirring draw 3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon bucket. If the water is chlorinated, leave overnight or stir for 30 minutes to outgas as much of the chlorine as possible. The water ideally should be warm, i.e. in the vicinity of 65 – 72℉. It may be warmed with sunlight, wood or gas, though electricity is not so ideal.

1st Evening: Barrel Compound (BC)—The first afternoon, add a one acre unit of barrel compound (⅓ cup) to three gallons of water and stir as below for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

Stirring: With arm or stirring stick, stir round and round to create a strong vortex. The water will become organized into laminar layers so that the cooler, denser layers move to the middle and sink while the warmer layers seek the edges and rise. The appearance is one of a spinning funnel and the water is organized. At this point reverse the direction of stirring. The water will churn and froth in chaos until a new vortex organizes. Once the new vortex is mature the direction is reversed again, and again, back and forth, 20 minutes each for BC and 508 and 1 hour each for 500 and 501. Every time a new vortex is established a new generation of organization is created. Organization is the basis of life, as living organisms are organized. By creating generation after generation of order, an evolution of order results. This charges up the remedy with life force while imparting the intentions and vibrations of the stirrer to the water. Then what one thinks, one grows.

Spraying: This spray should soak into the soil, much as does the dew, and should be sprinkled in the late afternoon in large droplets. Each drop radiates up to 6 feet, so there is no need for uniform coverage. Since life force flows from lower to higher concentration, spraying in this fashion will draw life force from the surrounding cosmos to the location sprayed. A pail and a wallpaper brush or whiskbroom is sufficient for applying this remedy.

1st Morning: Horsetail Decoction (508)—Prior to stirring, make a decoction, which is a brew simmered for 20 minutes, from 8 ounces of dried horsetail herb in ¾ gallon of water. In the early morning, dilute the pre-made decoction to 3 gallons with warm water and stir as above for 20 minutes. Apply this preparation to evaporate upward.

1st Evening: Horn Manure (500)—Add a one acre unit (¼ cup) of horn manure to three gallons of warm water and stir for 1 hour. Spray on the soil in large droplets.

2nd Morning: Horn Silica (501)— Add a one acre unit of horn silica (1 gram) to three gallons of water and stir as before for an hour. In summer, spray this remedy as a mist so it radiates upward into the lower atmosphere as a fine mist over the leaf canopy, perhaps chest or head high in the early morning. It may settle before evaporating, which is good. In winter, when warmth and light have receded into the earth, this should be misted directly onto the soil.

3rd Evening: Milk—In the evening, dilute a pint of milk in 3 gallons of warm water and stir for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

3rd Morning: Honey—In the early morning, dilute an ounce of honey in 3 gallons of water and stir for 20 minutes. Apply as a fine mist that evaporates upward.

4th Evening: Repeat Sequence from beginning starting with barrel compost.

 

Biodynamic preparations can be obtained at a modest cost from The Josephine Porter Institute (JPI), P. O. Box 133, Woolwine, Virginia 24185-0133. Tel: (276)930 – 2463 (Mon-Fri 8am-5pm). www.jpibiodynamics.org/

 


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Sidebar Two:

 

El Niño/La Niña

 

The Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest driver of evaporation and weather. Scientists have long studied something called the Southern Oscillation or the irregular but periodic shift of tropical warmth between the western Pacific and eastern Pacific Oceans.

With an El Niño the eastern Pacific Ocean becomes noticeably warmer off the coast of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, generally around Christmas. The resulting evaporation of moisture rises into the upper atmosphere, accelerated by the Andes Mountains. This charges up the upper atmosphere with moisture which tends to shift precipitation toward the polar latitudes. This generally means droughts for large parts of the world. However, this can only go on so long before evaporation brings in cold currents in the lower ocean to replenish what evaporated. This cools off the El Niño cycle and shifts the balance of warmth back toward the western Pacific.

La Niña, on the other hand, is a condition of elevated warmth in the western Pacific where there is no wall of high mountains. This sends moisture up into the lower atmosphere driving monsoons.

Until the age of Chaos Theory the trend in science was to study things by reducing them to extreme simplicity. Scientists struggling to use a systems approach that included as many variables as possible were relegated to the fringes and sometimes ridiculed. However, with weather—as with agriculture—single factor analysis is the apex of absurdity. Fortunately the age of computing has provided the tools for modeling complex systems involving many variables.

Taken as a whole, our stable global weather cycles have been going on since the dawn of history, fed and driven by warmth and other organizational factors—though recent global warming seems to have raised our weather intensity a bit. From a longer perspective, however, the world has alternated between long glacial periods and brief inter-glacials, and the tipping points are obscure. There seem to have been periods, occasionally, where the poles melted and ocean levels were considerably higher. Presently we seem on the cusp of change, but whether that will be to a warmer cycle or an ice age is uncertain.

Chaos theory scientists acknowledge the obscurity of organizational factors by giving them such names as the “strange attractor” and the “butterfly effect”. Modeling organizational factors has been a challenge, especially for scientists who previously believed everything simply degenerated into chaos. How to describe the rise of order out of chaos?

At least we can study warmth. Obviously the earth is warmest around the equator and coolest near the poles. This means the atmosphere heats up and expands near the equator and shrinks at the poles, which is what drives weather. Around the equator the portion of the earth’s atmosphere where weather occurs—known as the troposphere—is roughly 10 miles deep, while near the poles it is only about 5 miles deep. This means that air warms and rises around the equator, and as it cools it slides off on a downhill path known as a thermocline towards the poles where it funnels down one or the other polar vortex driving winter storms. The stronger the evaporation around the equator the more strongly this drives winter storms—and the occurrence of more powerful winter storms is one of the signs of global warming.

The oceans do something similar with the Gulf Stream and the Japan Current sliding down thermoclines toward Norway and Alaska. However, the melting of the northern polar icecap may shut down the Gulf Stream’s thermocline, which has weather scientists wondering whether that means a new ice age for northern Europe and Siberia. Could global warming be the trigger for an ice age? Alas, there are many unknowns, but most notably, the oscillation of surface temperatures between the eastern and western Pacific has a pronounced effect on evaporation and thus on rainfall, with the tilt of the earth’s axis as a major factor in causing oscillations. The fact that Pacific warming trends are strongest around Christmas when the sun is furthest south earns this cycle the title of the Southern Oscillation.

As stated previously, the periodic effect of the Southern Oscillation is irregular, and the key to its better management would be identifying and understanding such organizational factors as the strange attractor and the butterfly effect. Familiarity with the biodynamic preparations as organizational factors used in agriculture is a logical starting point for such research.

 

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Sidebar Three:

 

From Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993). –By Hugh Courtney
First of all, the sequential spraying technique was developed by myself, almost accidentally, in the early summer of 1988 when it appeared that we were about to face a third year of blistering drought. Frustrated by that possibility, I reasoned that surely there had to be something in biodynamic agriculture that could relieve or at least ameliorate the damage to our pastures, hayfields and gardens, after all, had not Steiner himself in the Agriculture course, (see Lecture #5, especially page 89), suggested that the preparations could help the plant attract to itself from its environment what was needed for its best growth? I thought surely, if one knew precisely what preparations to use, then relief should be available somehow. That is if one assumes that biodynamics really is valid and truly works. In my case, however, I did not have the wisdom to know the precise preparation to use.

At this point in my work with the preparations, I was convinced that it would be fairly difficult to cause harm with them, even if one used them in a situation that did not seem appropriate.
The worst thing in such a case would be that their effects could be reduced or negligible. So, I chose to use all nine of them. The six compost preparations were applied in the form of Barrel Compost (Thun recipe) along with BD #500, BD #501, and BD #508. I reasoned that I should commence in the evening with Barrel Compost, since the generally accepted biodynamic practice is to begin with the compost preparations. I followed the next morning with BD #508, and since I had been very much impressed with the work of Lilly Kolisko, and since I already had some on hand, I chose to use the fermented version of BD #508 as detailed in her work, Agriculture of Tomorrow. In the evening of the second day I applied the BD #500. On the morning of the third day, I sprayed the BD #501(c) which is a crystal silica material found in a matrix of rectorite, a clay-like substance. I had been experimenting with this form of #501 and had been very pleased with the results to this point, so it was an obvious choice for me.
Since I was treating hayfields, and was very interested in the water element anyway, I chose to apply the sequence in a leaf period, which turned out to be just before the full moon,  on the 26th, 27th and 28th of June 1988. Sometime within the following night, we received a nice, lengthy , soaking rain which totaled around .9 of an inch.