Field Broadcasters

Field Broadcasting 25 Years On

By Hugh Lovel

 

 

 

T. Galen Hieronymus introduced his first ‘Cosmic Pipes’ in the mid-1980s and shortly thereafter Jerry Friedenstein introduced what he called ‘Towers of Power’. These were early versions of passive, self-driven field devices using pattern energy to set up induction fields that enhanced biological processes. The Hieronymus design in particular worked like a crystal radio set, driven by the charge differential between the soil and the atmosphere.

 

Initially the concept was to increase soil vitality with beneficial patterns of energy. This could feed plants better nutrition from the soil and improve agricultural results. Hieronymus’s early experiments indicated energy patterns could be conveyed through copper wires and imparted at a receipt point represented by any sort of ‘witness’. This witness could be a serum specimen, a photograph, a map or even a name of a distinct person or place. This wasn’t a new concept, as Hieronymus patented his ‘eloptic’ analyser based on these discoveries back in 1949.

 

Getting Started

Long ago I learned faith provides the courage to seek, and what you seek you find. In 1985 a neighbour loaned me a copy of ACRES, USA, prodding me to look into Galen’s ‘cosmic pipe’. I then subscribed to ACRES and found time to visit Galen and his wife Sarah at their Oasis slightly over an hour away in Lakemont, GA. With my background in quantum physics everything made sense, as my university professors had argued that quantum rules, such as non-locality, entanglement and coherence, applied at every level of the universe. This was just what I had been looking for.

 

As a market gardener I grew many different kinds of crops, so Galen gave me one of his Cosmic Pipes to experiment with. At first I didn’t know what I was doing and set it up against the bank below my chicken coop. Galen and his wife Sarah visited, and he suggested the top plate had to be at least 8 feet away from anything related to the ground to have enough head room to work, so I moved it out across the driveway into a patch I was planting in corn where a Bray 2 test showed 278 lbs/acre phosphorous despite previous signs of phosphorous deficiency. I’d thought to remedy that by placing valerian flower juice (BD 507), a noted phosphorous remedy, in the reagent well. For sure, the corn grew robustly with no signs of phosphorous deficiency, and initially I thought this was good.

 

Also I’d sowed carrots with a few radishes mixed in to mark the rows, and I was disappointed when the radishes bloomed at four weeks and simply crispend and died in six—no radishes and no seed. That seemed a little strange, but after two months scattered carrots started to bloom, and they too crispend and died—no carrots, no seed. Very strange. Soon the corn started to tassel, but three weeks afterwards only a few stalks had developed ears and presented silks. Even these made no corn. My tomatoes had bloomed and burned up, and my peppers seemed to be going the same way. I was extremely puzzled, and I asked myself, what was going on?

 

With a start, I realized the valerian flower juice [BD 507] in the reagent well had thrown everything out of balance. The phosphorous process is a burning process that culminates in flowering, and due to the Cosmic Pipe it had overwhelmed all the other biological processes.

 

Learning

Obviously Galen’s technology worked, but the message was to be careful with the reagent patterns. By broadcasting nothing but the BD 507 I had thrown things seriously out of balance and over-stimulated the phosphorous process all by itself. Over the years the issue of balance has turned out to be the most damaging beginner’s error. As a solution, using my Hieronymus Analyser, I made a reagent that included all of the biodynamic preparations (numbered 500-508) as well as a microbial culture and a fossil humate fertilizer with a 5-3-3-2-2 analysis, and the results easily were the best I had experienced in farming. However, that was 1988 and I still had a lot to learn.

 

The next year, for the first time, my old washed-out, eroded soils put in a genuinely good performance. In October I visited Harvey Lisle, a biodynamic pioneer who lived in Ohio, and we made paper disc chromatograms from my soils and produce crops. Urea showed up quite clearly in every chromatogram except my compost. I had never used urea. To sort this out, I talked to Leland Taylor of Agronics in New Mexico who manufactured the humate fertiliser with 5% nitrogen, and he said it was no secret, his fossil humate, Rico Verde™, was boosted with urea. However, he explained, when applied to a garden or field soil, the microbial activity nourished by the humates would convert the urea to amino acids within a day or two. I’m sure that was correct.

 

But, obviously that did not apply to field broadcasting which put out the pattern without the bulk microbial food. The only place I had enough microbial activity to keep the urea converted was in my compost piles. No wonder I smelled a whiff of urea every time I fried one of my ‘yard’ eggs. As a biodynamic farmer I was very sensitive to the difference between ‘funny’ nitrogen, such as urea, and functional amino acid nitrogen, and thus I substituted Agronics’ raw humate, Clodbuster™, for the Rico Verde™ in my reagents, whereupon the hint of urea disappeared. The eggs were the best ever, the chickens were broody for the first time, and the farm seemed happy. This was a bit more than two years on into experimenting with the Hieronymus Cosmic Pipe.

 

Epiphany

 

Over the following seven years my potato crops continually improved. However, over the last six of those years I lost my tomato crop to decomposition just prior to ripening—a week earlier each year. First it was the beginning of October, then it marched back across September to where at the last I lost my tomatoes at the end of August. Mysteriously some kind of imbalance was building up.

 

Market gardening is very sensitive to the influences of the surrounding cosmos which constantly shift this way and that. You always win some and lose some. This, however, was a consistent trend. Eventually I realized the flaw in Galen’s concept was his Cosmic Pipe design built up the mineral, biological, digestive and nutritive forces in the soil, but it entirely neglected the atmospheric processes of photosynthesis, blossoming, fruiting and ripening. Potatoes are a crop very close to the soil, while tomatoes are a crop of the atmosphere. By constantly building up the forces in the soil while neglecting the atmosphere, things soon got to where my tomatoes never ripened but were digested while my potatoes thrived—proof once again that the technology worked, but also proof it had to be applied in a balanced way.

 

At this point I made a complete re-design with two wells, two circuits and two broadcast coils—one set for the soil and another, mirror image of the first, for the atmosphere. In the bottom well I used homeopathic potencies of all the lime polarity biodynamic preparations, and in the top well all the silica polarity ones. And, because of having to face such wisecracks as, “Cosmic Pipe, eh? What do you smoke in it?” I called my new copyright design a Field Broadcaster since what it did was broadcast a patterned induction field to the land. On my farm the following year I was hauling full loads of beautiful vine ripe tomatoes to my markets. At this point I decided to manufacture and sell units.

 

Lessons in Manufacturing

 

From the start, Hieronymus’s worst design flaw was condensation of moisture inside the pipe. Unless the pipe was sealed, daytime expansion of the air inside meant cool, moist air came back in at night, and moisture would collect in the bottom and gradually fill up the tube. This affected the broadcast and the results were not desirable. My new design made this a lot harder to happen. While manufacturing flaws can occur, if the assembly is air tight and the well jars are seated with silicone caulk, this cannot occur.

 

While I published the basic design, both in ACRES, USA and ACRES Australia, there’s only so much information one can give when it comes to manufacturing technique. I wanted individual farmers to experiment. However, publishing plans was not meant to fuel commercial production. Lloyd Charles, an Australian biodynamic farmer that I collaborated with to produce my broadcasters in Australia, reckoned it probably takes making 20 broadcasters to get on top of manufacturing technique so a reliable product is produced, and I quite agree. Even then, given a 5 year warranty on defects and customer feedback, manufacturing flaws turn up.

 

Quality control—thoroughness, skill, dedication and testing—are a product of learning experiences born out of making mistakes. I’ve seen a lot of homemade field broadcasters with a variety of deficiencies, and filling up with water is the leading cause of malfunction. One farmer in a high rainfall area of New Zealand had a friend make him a broadcaster rather than order one from overseas. It filled up with what I believe was high sodium water, because over a period of several years his soil sodium levels climbed and climbed to where they were 4% of his CEC and more than double his potassium levels. This seriously affected his production and frustrated all attempts at correction. From any ordinary point of view it made little sense

 

Also, livestock—particularly cows or horses—like to rub up against the broadcaster and soon will snap it off.  This has turned out to be the second most common problem, is not covered under warranty, and it can happen to any broadcaster lacking a secure corral. Accidents with equipment come under this heading too.

Broadcastyer corral (1)

 

 

  

 

 

 

Field Broadcaster in a corral on an Australian Cattle Station

 

 

 

Indiscriminate use of chemical fertilisers and poisons around the broadcaster or in its near vicinity is another major concern. Twice I’ve seen entire banana plantations turn noticeably yellow when glyphosate was applied around the base of their broadcasters.

 

Most alarming of all, one day while I was out a fellow called and left a message that he had built one of my ‘cosmic pipes’ and put Black Flag™ in it—was that going to take care of his insects? Unfortunately he didn’t leave a number, and this was back when we didn’t have smart phones that remembered callers’ numbers. A commercial insecticide such as Black Flag™ surely would have ‘taken care’ of his insects—and also his dog, cat, kids, wife, etc. and himself. What’s left of him may be six feet under and pushing up daisies. I guess he wasn’t thinking of the sixth commandment, Thou shalt not kill; but it’s amazing how widespread the Cain mentality is. In the Biblical story, when Cain felt he had a problem with his brother, Abel, his solution was murder. If a farmer doesn’t like a weed or an insect, the usual solution is just kill it. Euphemistically this is called control, but personally, I think it is an extremely dangerous approach.

 

 

 

On the Positive Side

 

 

 

On the other hand one broadcaster owner called me up, and with no pause for pleasantries said, “I haven’t slept a wink in over a week.”

 

I responded, “What are you talking about?”

 

He blurted, “Even the dog and the cat are jumping out of their skins. What do I do?”

 

My response was, “Okay. What have you done?”

 

“I had a bag of Azomite™, and ever since I spread it around my Field Broadcaster I haven’t gotten a wink of sleep.”

 

He sounded very distraught—almost in tears—and I was beginning to understand. I asked, “The whole bag? How close to the broadcaster?”

 

“Yeah, the whole bag, maybe in an eight foot radius.”

 

“I see. Well look, you’d have been fine if you’d used a handful or two over that area, but Azomite™ is a super high energy mineral, and the whole bag was a massive overdose. You need to scrape up as much as you can and spread it out like a normal field application.”

 

This illustrates that whatever is going on in the immediate vicinity of the field broadcaster becomes part of the patterns that are broadcast. The corollary is that balanced improvement of the soil in the immediate vicinity of the broadcaster will have a favourable effect all over the property—just don’t overdo it. We recommend to people that they spray a complex of biodynamic preparations around the broadcaster when they install it. In America I usually recommend the Pfeiffer Field and Garden Spray from the Josephine Porter Institute. In Australia I like to recommend the Soil Activator preparation available from Biodynamic Agriculture Australia (02 6655 0566). As for what to plant around the broadcaster, my favourite is a stinging nettle patch around the base.

 

Quantum Homeopathy

Via dowsing, Harvey Lisle was the first to discover that burying vials of various biodynamic preparations in their physical form a couple inches deep along the east side of his Hieronymus Cosmic Pipe would project these remedies into the broadcast. However, when he left these raw preparations there for prolonged periods some undesirable effects occurred. This was the first clue that field broadcasting worked better with homeopathic preparation patterns than with the raw materials. The physical substances were overwhelming if not diluted so that their subtle patterns came to the fore.

 

While there are a lot of amazing success stories out there about putting physical materials or preparations in the wells or next to the broadcast coils for a few days and then removing them, the key to lasting success is removing them again.

 

For example, a dairy farmer in southeast Queensland had over 80% of his farm flooded for a couple weeks. When the water receded the pastures were water logged and anaerobic. In a conference call with other field broadcaster owners it was suggested he bury a vial of hydrogen peroxide alongside his broadcaster for a few days, and he did. Almost immediately the pastures bounced back and started growing, where across the highway his neighbour’s pastures remained sodden and bedraggled for more than a month. After a few days this dairy farmer removed the vial, as advised, and things went well; but try to imagine what would happen if hydrogen peroxide was part of the broadcast 24/7/365. It wouldn’t take long before serious imbalances showed up.

 

I’ve done this sort of thing with solubor, and by the third day every animal on the farm, including the rabbits and myself, had very, very loose stools. With copper sulphate the effects were so noticeable in three weeks that everyone on the farm was complaining of going numb in any part of their bodies that had received any sort of a recent electric shock, even a low grade one.

 

On the other hand, 30c potencies of various raw substances left in the wells for months and months never showed any physical symptoms—although tissue tests showed the boron, copper, calcium, molybdenum or whatever soon showed up in the plants.

 

Subtle Energies

 

The general category most pattern energy modalities fall into—like colour therapy, homeopathy, field broadcasters and radionic devices—is called ‘subtle’ energy because these low level quantum effects usually aren’t immediately physical like hammers, levers and gears. It takes paying attention to details, as well as the overall picture and the progression of events, to realize what the effects are. Dowsing can be used to detect extremely subtle effects, which is how Harvey Lisle noticed that any substance placed in the soil adjacent to his Cosmic Pipe immediately affected the entire induction field of the broadcast.

 

A grazer in the Inland Empire north of Spokane, Washington recently told us he noticed the effects of his broadcaster immediately because he had Lyme disease and the treatment caused something called a Herxheimer Reaction from sudden, massive elimination of dead cells. His doctor had prescribed that he take molybdenum supplementation for this, and the reagent package for his broadcaster had 30c sodium molybdate in both top and bottom wells. Whenever he was on his property with the field broadcaster his Herxheimer reaction was greatly reduced.

 

Another milestone was laid down in the early days by Mark Moeller, a radionic agricultural consultant who worked with Hieronymus. Mark was the first to insist that that broadcasts must be limited to individual properties, as we have neither the moral nor legal right to affect others’ properties without their informed consent.

 

My hat’s off to Mark, but as far as I’m aware I was the first to realize that because of quantum entanglement we could use aerial maps of the broadcaster owner’s property with the boundaries marked, along with a written intent that defined the area of the broadcast. The result of this was an even, resonant containment and build-up of the energetic patterns within the broadcast area, and a large improvement in results.

 

These sorts of lessons arise from trained observation of natural processes by folks skilled in the detection of imbalances and apt in finding corrective measures that increase and enhance beneficial effects. In short, field broadcasters are best placed, maintained and programmed by people with an in-depth familiarity with agriculture and a profound understanding of nature. To this end my wife, Shabari, and I are training and certifying Quantum Agriculture graduates who are equipped to install and service field broadcasters as an aspect of a comprehensive agricultural consultancy aimed at achieving consistent quality results.

 

The Coattails of Change

Needless to say we feel considerable responsibility to warn against fraud. A new technology like this acts as a magnet for fast talking scam artists who rely on gullibility and ignorance. Field broadcasting fits this bill because few people are well grounded in quantum theory or how nature works in thriving, self-sufficient ecosystems. This makes it a risk to deal with anyone without a proven track record behind them. There have been copies including out-and-out rip-offs of my designs for commercial purposes along with re-printings of my articles, customer testimonials, photos and frequently asked questions straight from my website. This is more than enough reason for us to train certified Quantum Agriculture representatives.

 

Back in the early days I wanted everyone to understand the concepts and have access to the design to experiment with. This has led to efforts by others to patent my design and/or to sell poorly manufactured units. While I think I should have expected this, the part that worries me most is giving a new technology a bad name. I don’t like seeing poorly made products sold in my name.

 

While beginners will make their own field broadcasters based on my published (copyright) design and—with little or no experience with reagent patterns—achieve wondrous success, these folks are more or less flying blind in a dense fog. Good luck you brave souls, pay close attention and wondrous things will happen—but they won’t all be good. Mistakes are the key to learning, so take care to minimize risk, have courage, and who knows what can be learned. Keep in touch, keep good records, ask questions and please, share results. That way we all will learn. The application of subtle energies in agriculture is a game changer on par with the development of the steam and internal combustion engines, and it heralds a new age in agriculture.

 

On the other hand people who go straight into manufacturing and selling hardware using my design for profit should contact me to work out a licensing agreement. I have had people blatantly rip me off and advertise that they are selling “Hugh Lovel Broadcasters” while I had no oversight in their manufacture and received nary a cent for either the use of my name and reputation or my copyright.

In Summary

My inadvertent beginner’s mistake of broadcasting the pattern of urea, which resulted in things growing well even though it poisoned the environment with low grade nitrogen salts, illustrates how essential a profound understanding of nature is for the success of field broadcasting. Nitrogen salts impair natural nitrogen fixation, which is what we really want if our farms or gardens are to produce abundant, quality results with little or no outside inputs while building soil to the benefit of mankind and the greater ecology. Sure, broadcasting the resonant pattern of urea created physical urea throughout the farm. Superficially it looked good, but nitrogen salts, including urea, are the antagonist of silica which is the basis of transport and organic integrity. The long range effects are pests, diseases and less than optimal nutrition. On the other hand, amino acid nitrogen, particularly the three sulphur containing amino acids found in cell walls, connective tissues and transport vessels are synergistic with silica, and it is this amino acid nitrogen that works with silica to give plants immunity to pests and diseases along with nutritional density.  

 

Unsurprisingly, silica is usually ignored in chemical agriculture where things look good on the surface, but at a subtler level are profoundly askew. The result is loss of protoplasmic density, cosmetic blemishes, disease and pest problems and a failure to raise the soil foodweb and the overall farm ecology to the level of robust self-sufficiency.

 

From the start, the problem with chemical agriculture has been excitement with what superficially looked great but at the core was rotten. Though agricultural science of the recent past is strewn with bad examples, we need to achieve the highest level of scientific integrity in agriculture. As Liebig pointed out, agriculture stands above all other professions. For all of the wonders of urbanization, sociologists continue to point out that civilization is utterly dependent on agriculture. This means it is a matter of greatest importance that we hold agriculture to the highest standard of integrity, as this will be reflected in our culture.

 

This was true when Justus von Liebig penned his mea culpa in 1873, “Indeed, Herein Lies the Crux of My Life”, and, it is every bit as true today. I believe it would be appropriate to redeem the great chemist and father of chemical agriculture’s reputation. We must adhere to a high standard, and the application of subtle energy patterns in agriculture may well help us accomplish that.

 

 

The worship of false doctrines must be destroyed I’ve long thought it sufficient in science to teach the truth and to spread it. However, the glorification of falsehood must be annihilated to establish a firm foundation for truth, and I’ve recently realized my error in agriculture was not pursuing this further. As my final wish, I pass on the mission to cleanse my teachings of the accumulated lies others have used to obscure them, lo these many years.

In truth, agriculture is both contemplative and spiritual Unfortunately almost no one realizes the truebeauty of agriculture—its inner spirituality and beingness. It warrants the best efforts of science—not only because of its produce and the benefits it bestows on those who understand the language of nature—but because it stands above all other vocations.

The Bondage of Error At one time, the view permeated my every fibre that plants obtained theirnourishment in soluble form. This view was false and was the source of my errant behaviour, but the human mind is a curious thing and it sees nothing beyond its field of vision.

 

–Justus von Liebig, Indeed, Herein Lies the Crux of My Life

 

Hugh Lovel, author of the book A Biodynamic Farm and frequent contributor to ACRES, USA and ACRES Australia is a multi-disciplinary scientist dedicated to abundant production of food of the highest quality while regenerating soil fertility and environmental health. He farmed for 30 years in Georgia before migrating to Australia as an agronomist, lecturer and consultant to growers from horticulture to grazing. He believes the best results come from empowering farmers to be well-informed and self-reliant, and he recommends only what is needed for best outcomes while saving growers money.  Mixing detailed explanations with practical examples, Hugh helps growers sort out problems of all types by learning to identify their causes rather than merely treating symptoms. Using what he calls the Biochemical Sequence and Comprehensive Testing, he points out how to interpret soils, crops, weeds and lab results to grasp the key importance of sulphur, boron and silicon, which all too often go ignored.

 

Shabari Bird Lovel, Hugh’s partner and former neighbour of 30 years, teaches  self-improvement as well as food preparation, fermentation and preservation. She has a passionate interest in agricultural ferments. Her late husband, Christopher Bird, co-authored Secret Life of Plants and Secrets of the Soil.

Shabari works actively with Hugh to update the “Reagents” for their Field Broadcaster clients around the world.

 

 

 

 

Field Broadcasting 25 Years On

FIELD BROADCASTING 25 YEARS ON        
by Hugh Lovel
Field Broadcaster garden_0

 

T. Galen Hieronymus introduced his first ‘Cosmic Pipes’ in the mid-1980s and shortly thereafter Jerry Friedenstein introduced what he called ‘Towers of Power’. These were early versions of passive, self-driven field devices using pattern energy to set up induction fields that enhanced biological processes. The Hieronymus design in particular worked like a crystal radio set, driven by the charge differential between the soil and the atmosphere.

 

Initially the concept was to increase soil vitality with beneficial patterns of energy. This could feed plants better nutrition from the soil and improve agricultural results. Hieronymus’s early experiments indicated energy patterns could be conveyed through copper wires and imparted at a receipt point represented by any sort of ‘witness’. This witness could be a serum specimen, a photograph, a map or even a name of a distinct person or place. This wasn’t a new concept, as Hieronymus patented his ‘eloptic’ analyser based on these discoveries back in 1949.

 

Getting Started

Long ago I learned faith provides the courage to seek, and what you seek you find. In 1985 a neighbour loaned me a copy of ACRES, USA, prodding me to look into Galen’s ‘cosmic pipe’. I then subscribed to ACRES and found time to visit Galen and his wife Sarah at their Oasis slightly over an hour away in Lakemont, GA. With my background in quantum physics everything made sense, as my university professors had argued that quantum rules, such as non-locality, entanglement and coherence, applied at every level of the universe. This was just what I had been looking for.

 

As a market gardener I grew many different kinds of crops, so Galen gave me one of his Cosmic Pipes to experiment with. At first I didn’t know what I was doing and set it up against the bank below my chicken coop. Galen and his wife Sarah visited, and he suggested the top plate had to be at least 8 feet away from anything related to the ground to have enough head room to work, so I moved it out across the driveway into a patch I was planting in corn where a Bray 2 test showed 278 lbs/acre phosphorous despite previous signs of phosphorous deficiency. I’d thought to remedy that by placing valerian flower juice (BD 507), a noted phosphorous remedy, in the reagent well. For sure, the corn grew robustly with no signs of phosphorous deficiency, and initially I thought this was good.

 

Also I’d sowed carrots with a few radishes mixed in to mark the rows, and I was disappointed when the radishes bloomed at four weeks and simply crispend and died in six—no radishes and no seed. That seemed a little strange, but after two months scattered carrots started to bloom, and they too crispend and died—no carrots, no seed. Very strange. Soon the corn started to tassel, but three weeks afterwards only a few stalks had developed ears and presented silks. Even these made no corn. My tomatoes had bloomed and burned up, and my peppers seemed to be going the same way. I was extremely puzzled, and I asked myself, what was going on?

 

With a start, I realized the valerian flower juice [BD 507] in the reagent well had thrown everything out of balance. The phosphorous process is a burning process that culminates in flowering, and due to the Cosmic Pipe it had overwhelmed all the other biological processes.

 

Learning

Obviously Galen’s technology worked, but the message was to be careful with the reagent patterns. By broadcasting nothing but the BD 507 I had thrown things seriously out of balance and over-stimulated the phosphorous process all by itself. Over the years the issue of balance has turned out to be the most damaging beginner’s error. As a solution, using my Hieronymus Analyser, I made a reagent that included all of the biodynamic preparations (numbered 500-508) as well as a microbial culture and a fossil humate fertilizer with a 5-3-3-2-2 analysis, and the results easily were the best I had experienced in farming. However, that was 1988 and I still had a lot to learn.

 

The next year, for the first time, my old washed-out, eroded soils put in a genuinely good performance. In October I visited Harvey Lisle, a biodynamic pioneer who lived in Ohio, and we made paper disc chromatograms from my soils and produce crops. Urea showed up quite clearly in every chromatogram except my compost. I had never used urea. To sort this out, I talked to Leland Taylor of Agronics in New Mexico who manufactured the humate fertiliser with 5% nitrogen, and he said it was no secret, his fossil humate, Rico Verde™, was boosted with urea. However, he explained, when applied to a garden or field soil, the microbial activity nourished by the humates would convert the urea to amino acids within a day or two. I’m sure that was correct.

 

But, obviously that did not apply to field broadcasting which put out the pattern without the bulk microbial food. The only place I had enough microbial activity to keep the urea converted was in my compost piles. No wonder I smelled a whiff of urea every time I fried one of my ‘yard’ eggs. As a biodynamic farmer I was very sensitive to the difference between ‘funny’ nitrogen, such as urea, and functional amino acid nitrogen, and thus I substituted Agronics’ raw humate, Clodbuster™, for the Rico Verde™ in my reagents, whereupon the hint of urea disappeared. The eggs were the best ever, the chickens were broody for the first time, and the farm seemed happy. This was a bit more than two years on into experimenting with the Hieronymus Cosmic Pipe.

 

Epiphany

 

Over the following seven years my potato crops continually improved. However, over the last six of those years I lost my tomato crop to decomposition just prior to ripening—a week earlier each year. First it was the beginning of October, then it marched back across September to where at the last I lost my tomatoes at the end of August. Mysteriously some kind of imbalance was building up.

 

Market gardening is very sensitive to the influences of the surrounding cosmos which constantly shift this way and that. You always win some and lose some. This, however, was a consistent trend. Eventually I realized the flaw in Galen’s concept was his Cosmic Pipe design built up the mineral, biological, digestive and nutritive forces in the soil, but it entirely neglected the atmospheric processes of photosynthesis, blossoming, fruiting and ripening. Potatoes are a crop very close to the soil, while tomatoes are a crop of the atmosphere. By constantly building up the forces in the soil while neglecting the atmosphere, things soon got to where my tomatoes never ripened but were digested while my potatoes thrived—proof once again that the technology worked, but also proof it had to be applied in a balanced way.

 

At this point I made a complete re-design with two wells, two circuits and two broadcast coils—one set for the soil and another, mirror image of the first, for the atmosphere. In the bottom well I used homeopathic potencies of all the lime polarity biodynamic preparations, and in the top well all the silica polarity ones. And, because of having to face such wisecracks as, “Cosmic Pipe, eh? What do you smoke in it?” I called my new design a Field Broadcaster since what it did was broadcast a patterned induction field to the land. On my farm the following year I was hauling full loads of beautiful vine ripe tomatoes to my markets. At this point I decided to manufacture and sell units.

 

Lessons in Manufacturing

 

From the start, Hieronymus’s worst design flaw was condensation of moisture inside the pipe. Unless the pipe was sealed, daytime expansion of the air inside meant cool, moist air came back in at night, and moisture would collect in the bottom and gradually fill up the tube. This affected the broadcast and the results were not desirable. My new design made this a lot harder to happen. While manufacturing flaws can occur, if the assembly is air tight and the well jars are seated with silicone caulk, this cannot occur.

 

While I published the basic design, both in ACRES, USA and ACRES Australia, there’s only so much information one can give when it comes to manufacturing technique. I wanted individual farmers to experiment. However, publishing plans was not meant to fuel commercial production. Lloyd Charles, an Australian biodynamic farmer that I collaborated with to produce broadcasters in Australia, reckoned it probably takes making 20 broadcasters to get on top of manufacturing technique so a reliable product is produced, and I quite agree. Even then, given a 5 year warranty on defects and customer feedback, manufacturing flaws turn up.

 

Quality control—thoroughness, skill, dedication and testing—are a product of learning experiences born out of making mistakes. I’ve seen a lot of homemade field broadcasters with a variety of deficiencies, and filling up with water is the leading cause of malfunction. One farmer in a high rainfall area of New Zealand had a friend make him a broadcaster rather than order one from overseas. It filled up with what I believe was high sodium water, because over a period of several years his soil sodium levels climbed and climbed to where they were 4% of his CEC and more than double his potassium levels. This seriously affected his production and frustrated all attempts at correction. From any ordinary point of view it made little sense

 

Also, livestock—particularly cows or horses—like to rub up against the broadcaster and soon will snap it off. This has turned out to be the second most common problem, is not covered under warranty, and it can happen to any broadcaster lacking a secure corral. Accidents with equipment come under this heading too.

                      

Indiscriminate use of chemical fertilisers and poisons around the broadcaster or in its near vicinity is another major concern. Twice I’ve seen entire banana plantations turn noticeably yellow when glyphosate was applied around the base of their broadcasters.

 

Most alarming of all, one day while I was out a fellow called and left a message that he had built one of my ‘cosmic pipes’ and put Black Flag™ in it—was that going to take care of his insects? Unfortunately he didn’t leave a number, and this was back when we didn’t have smart phones that remembered callers’ numbers. A commercial insecticide such as Black Flag™ surely would have ‘taken care’ of his insects—and also his dog, cat, kids, wife, etc. and himself. What’s left of him may be six feet under and pushing up daisies. I guess he wasn’t thinking of the sixth commandment, Thou shalt not kill; but it’s amazing how widespread the Cain mentality is. In the Biblical story, when Cain felt he had a problem with his brother, Abel, his solution was murder. If a farmer doesn’t like a weed or an insect, the usual solution is just kill it. Euphemistically this is called control, but personally, I think it is an extremely dangerous approach.

 

 

 

On the Positive Side

 

 

 

On the other hand one broadcaster owner called me up, and with no pause for pleasantries said, “I haven’t slept a wink in over a week.”

 

I responded, “What are you talking about?”

 

He blurted, “Even the dog and the cat are jumping out of their skins. What do I do?”

 

My response was, “Okay. What have you done?”

 

“I had a bag of Azomite™, and ever since I spread it around my Field Broadcaster I haven’t gotten a wink of sleep.”

 

He sounded very distraught—almost in tears—and I was beginning to understand. I asked, “The whole bag? How close to the broadcaster?”

 

“Yeah, the whole bag, maybe in an eight foot radius.”

 

“I see. Well look, you’d have been fine if you’d used a handful or two over that area, but Azomite™ is a super high energy mineral, and the whole bag was a massive overdose. You need to scrape up as much as you can and spread it out like a normal field application.”

 

This illustrates that whatever is going on in the immediate vicinity of the field broadcaster becomes part of the patterns that are broadcast. The corollary is that balanced improvement of the soil in the immediate vicinity of the broadcaster will have a favourable effect all over the property—just don’t overdo it. We recommend to people that they spray a complex of biodynamic preparations around the broadcaster when they install it. In America I usually recommend the Pfeiffer Field and Garden Spray from the Josephine Porter Institute. In Australia I like to recommend the Soil Activator preparation available from Biodynamic Agriculture Australia (02 6655 0566). As for what to plant around the broadcaster, my favourite is a stinging nettle patch around the base.

 

Quantum Homeopathy

Via dowsing, Harvey Lisle was the first to discover that burying vials of various biodynamic preparations in their physical form a couple inches deep along the east side of his Hieronymus Cosmic Pipe would project these remedies into the broadcast. However, when he left these raw preparations there for prolonged periods some undesirable effects occurred. This was the first clue that field broadcasting worked better with homeopathic preparation patterns than with the raw materials. The physical substances were overwhelming if not diluted so that their subtle patterns came to the fore.

 

While there are a lot of amazing success stories out there about putting physical materials or preparations in the wells or next to the broadcast coils for a few days and then removing them, the key to lasting success is removing them again.

 

For example, a dairy farmer in southeast Queensland had over 80% of his farm flooded for a couple weeks. When the water receded the pastures were water logged and anaerobic. In a conference call with other field broadcaster owners it was suggested he bury a vial of hydrogen peroxide alongside his broadcaster for a few days, and he did. Almost immediately the pastures bounced back and started growing, where across the highway his neighbour’s pastures remained sodden and bedraggled for more than a month. After a few days this dairy farmer removed the vial, as advised, and things went well; but try to imagine what would happen if hydrogen peroxide was part of the broadcast 24/7/365. It wouldn’t take long before serious imbalances showed up.

 

I’ve done this sort of thing with solubor, and by the third day every animal on the farm, including the rabbits and myself, had very, very loose stools. With copper sulphate the effects were so noticeable in three weeks that everyone on the farm was complaining of going numb in any part of their bodies that had received any sort of a recent electric shock, even a low grade one.

 

On the other hand, 30c potencies of various raw substances left in the wells for months and months never showed any physical symptoms—although tissue tests showed the boron, copper, calcium, molybdenum or whatever soon showed up in the plants.

 

Subtle Energies

 

The general category most pattern energy modalities fall into—like colour therapy, homeopathy, field broadcasters and radionic devices—is called ‘subtle’ energy because these low level quantum effects usually aren’t immediately physical like hammers, levers and gears. It takes paying attention to details, as well as the overall picture and the progression of events, to realize what the effects are. Dowsing can be used to detect extremely subtle effects, which is how Harvey Lisle noticed that any substance placed in the soil adjacent to his Cosmic Pipe immediately affected the entire induction field of the broadcast.

 

A grazer in the Inland Empire north of Spokane, Washington recently told us he noticed the effects of his broadcaster immediately because he had Lyme disease and the treatment caused something called a Herxheimer Reaction from sudden, massive elimination of dead cells. His doctor had prescribed that he take molybdenum supplementation for this, and the reagent package for his broadcaster had 30c sodium molybdate in both top and bottom wells. Whenever he was on his property with the field broadcaster his Herxheimer reaction was greatly reduced.

 

Another milestone was laid down in the early days by Mark Moeller, a radionic agricultural consultant who worked with Hieronymus. Mark was the first to insist that that broadcasts must be limited to individual properties, as we have neither the moral nor legal right to affect others’ properties without their informed consent.

 

My hat’s off to Mark, but as far as I’m aware I was the first to realize that because of quantum entanglement we could use aerial maps of the broadcaster owner’s property with the boundaries marked, along with a written intent that defined the area of the broadcast. The result of this was an even, resonant containment and build-up of the energetic patterns within the broadcast area, and a large improvement in results.

 

These sorts of lessons arise from trained observation of natural processes by folks skilled in the detection of imbalances and apt in finding corrective measures that increase and enhance beneficial effects. In short, field broadcasters are best placed, maintained and programmed by people with an in-depth familiarity with agriculture and a profound understanding of nature. To this end my wife, Shabari, and I are training and certifying Quantum Agriculture graduates who are equipped to install and service field broadcasters as an aspect of a comprehensive agricultural consultancy aimed at achieving consistent quality results.

 

The Coattails of Change

Needless to say we feel considerable responsibility to warn against fraud. A new technology like this acts as a magnet for fast talking scam artists who rely on gullibility and ignorance. Field broadcasting fits this bill because few people are well grounded in quantum theory or how nature works in thriving, self-sufficient ecosystems. This makes it a risk to deal with anyone without a proven track record behind them. There have been copies including out-and-out rip-offs of my designs for commercial purposes along with re-printings of my articles, customer testimonials, photos and frequently asked questions straight from my website. This is more than enough reason for us to train certified Quantum Agriculture representatives.

 

Back in the early days I wanted everyone to understand the concepts and have access to the design to experiment with. This has led to efforts by others to patent my design and/or to sell poorly manufactured units. While I think I should have expected this, the part that worries me most is giving a new technology a bad name. I don’t like seeing poorly made products sold in my name.

 

While beginners will make their own field broadcasters based on my published (copyright) design and—with little or no experience with reagent patterns—achieve wondrous success, these folks are more or less flying blind in a dense fog. Good luck you brave souls, pay close attention and wondrous things will happen—but they won’t all be good. Mistakes are the key to learning, so take care to minimize risk, have courage, and who knows what can be learned. Keep in touch, keep good records, ask questions and please, share results. That way we all will learn. The application of subtle energies in agriculture is a game changer on par with the development of the steam and internal combustion engines, and it heralds a new age in agriculture.

 

On the other hand people who go straight into manufacturing and selling hardware using my design for profit should contact me to work out a licensing agreement. I have had people blatantly rip me off and advertise that they are selling “Hugh Lovel Broadcasters” while I had no oversight in their manufacture and received nary a cent for either the use of my name and reputation or my copyright.

In Summary

My inadvertent beginner’s mistake of broadcasting the pattern of urea, which resulted in things growing well even though it poisoned the environment with low grade nitrogen salts, illustrates how essential a profound understanding of nature is for the success of field broadcasting. Nitrogen salts impair natural nitrogen fixation, which is what we really want if our farms or gardens are to produce abundant, quality results with little or no outside inputs while building soil to the benefit of mankind and the greater ecology. Sure, broadcasting the resonant pattern of urea created physical urea throughout the farm. Superficially it looked good, but nitrogen salts, including urea, are the antagonist of silica which is the basis of transport and organic integrity. The long range effects are pests, diseases and less than optimal nutrition. On the other hand, amino acid nitrogen, particularly the three sulphur containing amino acids found in cell walls, connective tissues and transport vessels are synergistic with silica, and it is this amino acid nitrogen that works with silica to give plants immunity to pests and diseases along with nutritional density.

 

Unsurprisingly, silica is usually ignored in chemical agriculture where things look good on the surface, but at a subtler level are profoundly askew. The result is loss of protoplasmic density, cosmetic blemishes, disease and pest problems and a failure to raise the soil foodweb and the overall farm ecology to the level of robust self-sufficiency.

 

From the start, the problem with chemical agriculture has been excitement with what superficially looked great but at the core was rotten. Though agricultural science of the recent past is strewn with bad examples, we need to achieve the highest level of scientific integrity in agriculture. As Liebig pointed out, agriculture stands above all other professions. For all of the wonders of urbanization, sociologists continue to point out that civilization is utterly dependent on agriculture. This means it is a matter of greatest importance that we hold agriculture to the highest standard of integrity, as this will be reflected in our culture.

 

This was true when Justus von Liebig penned his mea culpa in 1873, “Indeed, Herein Lies the Crux of My Life, and, it is every bit as true today. I believe it would be appropriate to redeem the great chemist and father of chemical agriculture’s reputation. We must adhere to a high standard, and the application of subtle energy patterns in agriculture may well help us accomplish that.

 

 

The worship of false doctrines must be destroyed I’ve long thought it sufficient in science to teach the truth and to spread it. However, the glorification of falsehood must be annihilated to establish a firm foundation for truth, and I’ve recently realized my error in agriculture was not pursuing this further. As my final wish, I pass on the mission to cleanse my teachings of the accumulated lies others have used to obscure them, lo these many years.

In truth, agriculture is both contemplative and spiritual Unfortunately almost no one realizes the truebeauty of agriculture—its inner spirituality and beingness. It warrants the best efforts of science—not only because of its produce and the benefits it bestows on those who understand the language of nature—but because it stands above all other vocations.

The Bondage of Error At one time, the view permeated my every fibre that plants obtained their nourishment in soluble form. This view was false and was the source of my errant behaviour, but the human mind is a curious thing and it sees nothing beyond its field of vision.

 

–Justus von Liebig, Indeed, Herein Lies the Crux of My Life

 

Hugh Lovel, author of the book A Biodynamic Farm and frequent contributor to ACRES, USA and ACRES Australia is a multi-disciplinary scientist dedicated to abundant production of food of the highest quality while regenerating soil fertility and environmental health. He farmed for 30 years in Georgia before migrating to Australia as an agronomist, lecturer and consultant to growers from horticulture to grazing. He believes the best results come from empowering farmers to be well-informed and self-reliant, and he recommends only what is needed for best outcomes while saving growers money. Mixing detailed explanations with practical examples, Hugh helps growers sort out problems of all types by learning to identify their causes rather than merely treating symptoms. Using what he calls the Biochemical Sequence and Comprehensive Testing, he points out how to interpret soils, crops, weeds and lab results to grasp the key importance of sulphur, boron and silicon, which all too often go ignored.

 

Shabari Bird Lovel, Hugh’s partner and former neighbour of 32 years, teaches self-awareness through Shamanism as well as food preparation, fermentation and preservation. She has a passionate interest in agricultural ferments. Her late husband, Christopher Bird, co-authored Secret Life of Plants and Secrets of the Soil.

Shabari works actively with Hugh to update the “Reagents” for their Field Broadcaster clients around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

Field Broadcasters and Soil Chemistry

 

 

Field Broadcaste​rs and Soil Chemistry

Hugh Lovel

Dear Eddie, I’ll try to respond to your long letter in as much detail as I can. I want to let Shabari in on the discussion as she will learn more about the chemical/mineral side of things that way. I had your problem with the disappearing boron back in my early days, where I put B on and it disappeared and I put more on and it disappeared and I split applications and it still disappeared. It went somewhere, but where did it go? Not into my crops—they tested deficient too. It wasn’t until I got onto mixing my boron into my composts and humifying the boron (storing it in large humic acid molecules) that it stuck around and became available to my crops. One learns these things the hard way it seems—the agricultural colleges and institutes are mostly in the pockets of the fertiliser industries, so they tend to be very weak on information that will save a farmer from buying more and more fertilisers. I also learned, the hard way, that biodynamic horn clay greatly enhanced the utilization of boron by plants and the stabilization of boron in the humic fraction of the soil. Over the last six years I’ve had good success in recommending to growers (especially those with low soil organic matter and chemical nitrogen inputs) that they put their boron out with humic acids, either as dry boron/humates or as liquid with liquid humic acids (NTS sells a dry granular boron humate that is 10% boric acid, but you can mix as much as 3 kg of solubor with 10 L of liquid humic concentrate (per hectare) and apply with water with good effect. In compost, which is probably your ideal way to apply B on your farm, you can adjust your concentration of solubor to where you have 3 kg of solubor in however much compost you spread on that hectare. I would not, however, that 2 kg of zeolite per ton of compost probably isn’t enough clay in the mix. Zeolite is a super clay and a wonderful builder of CEC, but to ensure sufficient clay for substrate for your humification microbes to live on and build clay/humus colloids I would add some other source of clay or loamy soil (about 10% of starting materials). In terms of making compost, you’re sure to have plenty of microbes present. The ones that predominate is rarely determined by adding microbes, but rather by adjusting the composition and conditions of what you are composting. Your mix of materials, timing and conditions of turning, moisture, carbon dioxide/oxygen, temperature, etc. all influence what sorts of microbes take over. For example, adding clay (and zeolite is wonderful but how cheap is it?) can really boost the all-important actinomycetes which tie up loose nitrogen and promote an end result rich in nitrogen fixing microbes that are poisoned by soluble nitrogen compounds. Certain herbs and residues promote certain communities of microbes too. For example, if you have a source of nettles this can be a wonderful balancing input in terms of green matter even at one part in a hundred (10 kg/ton). Grasses supply silicon and legumes calcium. Various herbs concentrate different minerals, such as copper, boron, zinc or manganese. You may have to sort out what your local weeds are doing. You are always better off making your trace minerals biological by adding them to the compost before applying them. Compost is food for your soil microbes and thus it is held on to and supplied to your crops with little or no loss. You want to manage your carbon/nitrogen ratio at somewhere between 25:1 to 30:1. That can help to minimize both methane/carbon dioxide loss and ammonia loss. Turn by 65 degrees C, or 15% CO2, and keep moisture up to 50% and keep compost covered. Biodynamic preparation patterns can be an enormous help with balanced, beneficial microbial activity, and you would get that from a properly operating field broadcaster with all the prep patterns in it. When you have good compost—even at only 1 to 2 tons per hectare—along with the biodynamic preparations and good biological management (which includes keeping vegetation growing as much of the time as possible, including on your headlands, banks, laneways, etc.) it can and should get to where you phase out nitrogen inputs altogether. My rule of thumb with conventional growers in conversion is when/if the grower thinks he needs nitrogen then he will need nitrogen. It’s been my experience, the hardest thing to change is the mind of the grower. Nitrogen inputs (in soluble form, not in humified compost) inhibit nitrogen fixation—full stop. Apply nitrogen and you will need it because you will shut down nitrogen fixation. I’ve guided a number of heavy nitrogen users out of their dependencies by teaching them first how to apply nitrogen inputs with humic acids to tie up the soluble forms as amino acid/humate complexes and second to monitor nitrogen levels in their leaf tests so they cut back even on those nitrogen/humic inputs as they maintain nitrogen levels in their crops. This also requires developing a different eye for what colour green indicates proper nitrogen levels and amino acid N vs nitrate N in the leaf. The proper colour of amino acid N is both lighter green and has more of a glow about it, whereas you may be chasing too dark a colour green with present levels of N fertilisation. Even ammonium sulphate I never add without humification first. And there’s nothing wrong with a whiff of N now and then. For example, calcium nitrate, which is just about as soluble as can be, is a wonderful boost at the rate of 5 kg with 15 L of molasses as an herbicidal weed spray at planting. It switches all sorts of tall woody weeds off starting with thistles because it creates a flush of just the sort of microbes that tie up loose potassium at seeding and shift the balance over to sprouting of clovers. But at 80 or 100 kg/ha of calcium nitrate at seeding and nowhere near enough molasses to feed energy to the soil biology you can massively poison nitrogen fixation and end up with nitrogen shortages when filling out crops at the end of cropping cycle—plus setting up disease and/or insect susceptibility.  The fact is I like working with people new to farming on land that hasn’t had nitrogen inputs for 2 or 3 years and by leading them away from applying more than very modest N applications they go right straight to building nitrogen fixing capacity and never go the heavy nitrogen route with all its problems of leaching, insects and diseases. By never getting into heavy nitrogen dependency we can concentrate on balancing and enhancing present mineral issues in the soil that help natural nitrogen fixation work. It may make slow steps forward at first, but there are no backward steps, and once natural nitrogen fixation takes over all other problems generally sort themselves out. Soybeans are a great crop to get started with this sort of program. Ideally you should never give soybeans ANY nitrogen inputs unless you want to reduce or inhibit nodulation. But inputs such as lime, gypsum and rock phosphates—along with humified traces such as boron, copper, zinc and manganese, and possibly also cobalt and molybdenum—can be crucial to nodulation and yield. Soy loves a mineral feast. Boron two weeks before flowering commences can be a big yield increaser, but too much boron at sprouting can cause burning at seed emergence. But any way, add boron with humates, and boron works from the soil up so if you apply as a foliar you want it to wash off the leaf and get in the soil before it is going to do much good. Soy is so good for feeding nitrogen fixation that a kilo of soy flour in a 1000 L shuttle of compost tea brew will have it reeking of ammonia at the end of a 24 hour brew cycle. It will be brimming with nitrogen fixing microbes. The thing about both nitrogen fixation and P solubilisation is they take energy. However, the digestion of the microbes that fix N and solubilize P is releasing energy. Both ways this process requires P, so both the N fixers and the protozoa that yield digestion also have to know how to access P. So you get a soil cooking and soluble P levels will rise. If you let the soil relax a bit in good grass the actinomycetes will tie up the loose P again in humic complexes. Cobalt is used by the protozoa as B-12 (cyanocobalamine) to access these humic complexes, and a soil that contains good reserve P but doesn’t release it is showing it needs Co. Even 500 g of cobalt sulphate in a ton of compost should give the required Co availability to get the soil’s digestion and nutrient release going again. As for the BioAssay, the reason most things will lag behind the General Vitality is the GV is showing you what is happening when everything works together—the synergy. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. When something is higher than the GV it is holding things back, but that doesn’t often occur, or not with many things. Usually everything else is lower than the GV. It’s the things that are lowest that reveal a need to boost them to raise the GV, but the GV SHOULD be higher than most other things. As for the pattern analysis, this is a research project of mine based on the different octaves of the periodic table. I’m trying to figure out what it means. Best wishes,Hugh Lovel

Replacing Soil Nutrients: A failure of Observation

Steve Solomon in Tasmania writes:

Friends,
I have put Tiedjens “Olena Farm” into the ag library at soilandhealth.org and am working on his “More Food From Soil Science” right now. It should be online in a few days. There is also a small collection of Tiedjens articles (and related items). If anyone has any other Tiedjens materials, please let me know. I have found Tiedjens mind-blowing.

Basically, what he did was to load the soil’s exchange capacity with calcium to 85% saturation and paid little attention to Mg other than to limit it to 10% of that 85%. In consequence, tiny quantities of liquid fertilizer did what it took regular farmers 10x the amount of ferts to accomplish. In case you don’t know, Tiedjens popularized (and did the fundamental research on) foliar feeding and hydroponics. He enjoyed taking worn out submarginal farms and converting them to highly productive land by the use of lime and almost homeopathic doses of fertilizers. Does anyone have any thoughts about the difference in outcome between targeting 85% calcium saturation (including some Mg) from the surface to four feet down, and paying no attention to the rest of the elements; or, targeting 68:12: 4: 2, as Albrecht advised.

Steve

 

 

Dear Steve,

Thanks for this. Seems like another proof that dynamics trumps substance in growing plants. I’m sure Tiejens is right in his results, and they should be easy enough to replicate.

Just off the top of my head I’d like to know the sand, clay and humus contents of the soils he experimented with.

However, with 85% Ca in his CEC he must have had a very porous soil even if it was heavy clay. That could mean good root penetration if the soil was mellow. On top of that, if he cut back the inputs of such salty things as NPK ferts tenfold (e.g. from  100 lbs/acre to 10 lbs/acre) they then wouldn’t burn off all those fine, penetrative roots like they normally do in commercial soils. That would allow the plant to have a large, fine root system with good symbiotic biology to glean the nutrients needed from the soil. Seems like a no-brainer, and should work with a range of light to heavy soils, though I suspect as a hydroponic researcher he was looking at the lighter end of the range. But maybe not. Personally I prefer to cut back even more on the inputs. I wouldn’t use any soluble nitrogen at all, but then it helps to use the BD preparations.

Starting a new garden on heavy, basalt clay in Guyra, NSW I’ve dug up the sod, separated the plant matter out for composting and planted English spinach and garlic together as companions in some parts. In other parts I’m growing a cover crop mixture of cereal rye/snow peas/mustards/turnips and rape, and along with them cabbages, broccoli, wong bok, kale, etc. On the surface I sprinkled a thin layer no more than 0.25 inches thick of fine, of mellow compost to make up for what I removed and to give a little humus to ensure the ‘earthly forces’, as Steiner describes them, work downward into the soil while the ‘earthly substance’ of lime works upwards.

I should add that this particular combination only works in autumn and winter. It’s autumn here so the light ether is receding though it is still working into the soil as the sugary products of photosynthesis being exuded at all the growing root tips, while the inner warmth of the earth rises up from within. There is a great dynamism occurring between what goes on above the soil surface and what goes on below.

I’ve been feeding the neighbour’s sheep with the rye and turnips because if I didn’t trim them they would be shading out the cabbages, wong boks, etc., and light is somewhat limited at this time of year. Theoretically the cover crop of rye/turnips/rape/mustards and peas are robbing the cabbages, broccolis, etc. of moisture and nutrients. If you pulled them all up and analysed them, they’ve taken up an enormous amount of water and nutrients from the soil where the cabbages are growing. That’s not what it looks like, though. It looks like they’ve nourished the cabbages.

I must confess that with a lifetime of experience I was watching for signs the cabbages, broccolis, etc. might be short on anything because I plan on eating them and this isn’t just a scientific experiment. I want better food than what’s available in the shops. I saw signs of zinc deficiency (clover leaves were very small in the paths, some cabbage leaves were deformed at their tips) and boron deficiency (wilting of broadleaves in mid-day heat, hollow stems in some mustards and peas) and gave the garden a light application of zinc sulphate along with a drench containing some humic acid and sea minerals (Olsson’s, rich in boron, etc.) but no nitrogen. There were also signs of copper deficiency (rust in the perennial rye pasture sod) but I figured the sea minerals would suffice for this. Of course, I’ve got the BD preps working, which in this case has been with a field broadcaster without any spray application in the traditional way. The growth is very robust and very lovely. Why would I spoil it with whacking doses of fertilisers when I can keep the biology going by growing companionable plants that complement each other and together keep the soil alive?

The common notion that we have to whack in a lot of NPK on things to equal what we might remove in crop material is a weird notion born out of failed observation. It simply isn’t true. We all should know that the most important of the NPK inputs—the N—is hovering in colossal abundance over every square centimetre of soil if we only provide a way for it to get in to where plant roots are giving off carbon compounds at their growing tips and microbes are converting the energy this supplies into nitrogen fixation, a very energy intensive process. Sure, we’ve got to have a lot of fine, growing root tips for that to happen. Why screw it up with massive doses of nitrogen salts? That would inhibit, if not burn, all those fine roots and shut down any microbial nitrogen fixation while leaching a wide range of nutrients starting with boron, silicon and calcium (I’m in a part of Australia with fairly reliable rain).

Hugh Lovel

 

 

Dear Hugh

Tiedjens put it this way: the TCEC of the soil is like deep shelves in a warehouse. Although a chemical extractant may get elements off the inner parts of the shelving, the plants may not. They do best getting what’s on the outer edges of the “shelves.” The soil test may show adequate amounts; the plants may not experience it that way. So if the exchange capacity is first preloaded with calcium, right to the brim, which is about 85% saturation, it leaves only a little space for other elements, and these will be readily available. So a small amount of NPK in liquid form will have a 10x effect compared to dumping it dry into “hungry” soil.

I had a major realization about this just recently. My own COF system is basically a Tiedjens system and I have not realized that for 20 years. I am having the user spread lime at about half to one ton/acre per year, year on year, gradually resulting in “overliming” that means less and less seedmeal and etc is needed to get a growth response, so as the soil is ever more fully loaded with calcium and more deeply loaded (down to 4′), then it needs less and less ferts, so the COF user gives less calcium as well. When I got worried last year about overliming my garden with COF, I was worrying about nothing. I’m definitely going to set up an area in my garden to run on COF. And if Tiedjens is right, then I can put small, safe quantities of Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe and B into the COF and they’ll be 10x as effective in tiny quantities. In ordinary soil it might take 250 lb K to make a big growth response but in calcium-saturated soil it might take only 50 lb to do the same thing.

Thinking this way, it would be good advice to someone starting a new garden where no significant soil improvement has yet happened, for starters, to spread ag lime at one to three tons per acre (depending on soil type). After that, COF will continue to build calcium levels. And I think having some gypsum in the COF will get calcium into the subsoil a lot faster than Tiedjens thought possible.

Steve

 

 

Dear Steve,

You may be on to something, but I wouldn’t be too simplistic about this.

What Tiedjens is pointing out is the TCEC (Total Cation Exchange Capacity) is an ion exchange medium with storage of Ca, Mg, K, Na and H along with a few traces such as Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Mo, etc. If the exchange medium is full, adding more calcium as calcium sulphate will effect some exchange between the excess calcium and some of the other cations and flush them off the medium. But adding lime will displace H. So as long as there is some Hydrogen in the exchange medium adding lime will mostly just displace hydrogen.

With clay as the ion exchange medium, the ions are layered. In a clay such as calcium bentonite there can be many layers of cations and even more layers of water attached to each clay particle. The colloidal particle size of a clay is down around ten to the minus ninth centimetres (1/1000000000cm), and at that size there are still a vast number of aluminium silicate molecules in the particle—which means there are a lot of layers of other positively charged atoms or molecules attracted to the anionic clay particle to balance its negative charge. Since the bonds are ionic rather than covalent (as with carbon chemistry) they constantly shift. However, the most tightly bound innermost layers hardly shift at all, and as such may not be exchangeable—which is why an aqua regia digest can show such markedly different results from a Mehlich III analysis. In plant tissues even the strong bonds, such as the magnesium held in the centre of a chlorophyll molecule, are important—so we use the aqua regia digest for tissue tests. But for soils this generally isn’t done because those innermost elements are generally unimportant and Cation Exchange Capacity does not take them into account as they aren’t generally displaceable. Anyway aqua regia digests show these innermost layers generally are populated with iron and magnesium rather than calcium.

We can’t just add calcium as lime to a low calcium soil and pump its ratio of cations up to 85% without—in many cases—going overboard into high pH. If we did we would have to nurse a steady stream of micronutrients through the medium to replace the elements calcium shunts off the medium to leach. The stream may be slight, but, depending on the availability of water and tendency to leach we are setting up conditions that render trace elements unavailable. You can add lime until you get the pH pretty close to neutral, but going overboard is not helpful. So you can add gypsum (calcium sulphate) and have some effect, but that also has its limits and until the sulphate leaches you may have an excess and THAT will readily leach copper, manganese, zinc and cobalt, which could be frustrating.

If you get too high a pH roots will pick up so much silicates along with the hydroxyl ions that it shifts the balance between silicate and borate and the roots swell but fail to transport fluid. To get the fluid moving again and reduce root swelling you have to add more borate—just the opposite of what you’d have to do in case you erred on the side of too much borate, had too much sap pressure and had to add silicates to achieve balance.

So mind the balance between the H ions and the OH ions. That’s your pH. With your high CEC soil you might add lime and have a wonderful experience, but that same recommendation to someone on a light soil might be ruinous.

With your COF (Complete Organic Fertiliser, I assume) approach you’re not doing quite the same with minerals, seed meals and so forth as a hydroponic grower would do with his totally soluble nutrient approach. The ‘organic’ hydroponic grower may complex his cations, including his traces, with humic and fulvic acids, and he may add micros very subtly with soluble kelp extracts and so forth but with hydroponics what you put in is all soluble. Thus you put in a trickle rather than a gush, like a Tiedjens system, and in most cases you wouldn’t put in enough at any one time to do root damage. Maybe with nitrogen inputs nitrogen fixation and amino acid release will be impaired or shut down, although I have seen hydroponic run-to-waste systems in heavy clay/loams where bacterial nitrogen fixation and protozoal amino acid release was working well enough to yield quality results.

Your COF approach with minerals and seed meals, etc. is much more of a trickle in system that works over days and weeks rather than directly via solubility. It feeds a wide range of soil organisms which digest and work it into the soil. Because of the activity it evokes it gives over a very fine stream of nutrients to the clay. It’s slow release and as such is already in the range of scaling back to a tenth of the input levels of soluble fertilisers such as the NPK type. If it was too much all at once the clay might not handle it all.

But I like your idea of some lime to draw this fine trickle from your COF upward into the plant. What I would suggest you try is a very dilute watering solution of hydrated lime [Ca(OH)2] and water that into the soil along with applications of the COF. Alternatively you might mix something like 0.1% hydrated lime into your COF formula—not enough to shift soil pH much even on a light soil, but enough to affect the activity of nutrient uptake without the danger of what Michael Astera was talking about where high pH results in fluid retention and root swelling. Otherwise, check your soil pH and add lime as you would normally. With a heavy clay like you’ve got, you could probably use some lime just to fill up your soil storage bank a bit.

And I might also suggest you will get a steadier trickle from your COF by placing it at the surface or just slightly below where the soil biology works it in gradually, rather than mixing it in deep so it works in too quickly. That’s where I believe you will get those good results Tiedjens was talking about.

 

Best,

Hugh Lovel

 

 

Dylan Ford, Long Island, New York responds:

Steve S, Hugh, et al

I’ve read probably as much received nonsense regarding growing crops as anyone, and one statement I encountered many times in the past has always troubled me.

“Lime makes the father rich, and the sons poor.”

Anyone got a clue as to what this might portend? I am particularly confused in the reference to the Calcium saturation prescribed by of Tiedjens and Solomon.

Dylan

 

Dear Dylan,

Very interesting.  Honestly I think this is one of those wry folk sayings that came from observation but isn’t always right. We have to keep coming back to observation and keep making observations rather than rushing to conclusions. No doubt this saying came from multiple observations, but I think it left out a few.

I think we’ve all seen instances where a deficiency of lime can be truly impoverishing, even though over liming, which I think Steve should be careful of, can indeed be detrimental. Over liming, and even over application of gypsum or dolomite, can unbalance the soil and may drive important trace elements off the clay colloid. In the case of gypsum the sulphate can leach copper and other trace elements and most soils don’t need that at all.

Liming shouldn’t be used simply to raise the pH. Dolomite raises pH more and often is cheaper, but too much dolomite can lock up a heavy soil so it doesn’t breathe well enough. It shifts the ratio of calcium to magnesium over to the magnesium side. Along with iron, magnesium tends to migrate into the inner layers surrounding the clay particles and makes the soil sticky when wet, and most heavy soils do not need much of that. It also can be expensive to correct.

Yet, bad lime advice abounds, and liming frequently is used just to raise pH. That can be a serious mistake and is just the sort of thing that makes the father rich but the sons poor. For more than a hundred years liming to raise the pH has been the norm taught in most agricultural schools, and the results have been masked by ever increasing applications of NPK—just what many ag schools are selling. People who make up sayings like this would be sure to notice, while ag professors might ignore results that didn’t fit their theories.

So there’s a lot of truth to the adage, “Lime makes the fathers rich but the sons poor”, but it isn’t universally true.

Best wishes,

Hugh Lovel

How To Make Rain 2012

            “A living organism has the astonishing gift of concentrating a ‘stream of order’ on itself, thus escaping the decay into atomic chaos.” –Erwin Schrödinger

            “It is the anomalies in nature that reveal the principles of life.” –Goethe

 

Enriching the Atmosphere By Hugh Lovel

 

My experience over the last 25 years shows it is possible to restore order to the atmosphere, a pre-requisite for rain. This could be an important part of returning farmers to self-sufficiency, and the methods— biodynamic sequential spraying, and/or radionic treatments with biodynamic reagents in combinations with color, sound and intents—are cheap and within the ability of most farmers to accomplish with relatively simple equipment. Only the know-how is lacking.

Weather is always changing, though it follows a pattern that oscillates back and forth within limits. Whenever it gets too hot and/or too dry it self-corrects to become cooler or wetter or both. However, this oscillation has obscure trigger points. MIT mathematician Edward Lorentz made this discovery in the mid ‘50s, giving rise to Chaos Theory. Chaos is a fact, but theory seeks to explain how it gives rise to order. Water evaporates, chaotically into the atmosphere. What makes it concentrate in clouds so dense they drop rain in certain places and at certain times—but not others?

 

The Stewardship of Rain

 

Often there is plenty of moisture in the air but no rain. Particularly in the southeastern USA the humidity can be 95% along with 95℉ without a cloud in the sky. In such conditions I can’t seem to draw much vitality from the atmosphere because it has so little. It is significantly worse in urban areas such as Atlanta, Georgia where summer thundershowers move across from western Douglas County, break up, go around urban Fulton and DeKalb counties, and resume their rain pattern in eastern Rockdale County. The traffic and industrial fumes that repel moisture and fuel the urban haze only abate on the weekends where weather statistics show 20% greater chances of rain on the family barbecue than on the weekday commute. What are we doing?

Global weather is a complicated self-correcting system. There is debate about the causes of global warming, but one thing is certain—global temperatures have risen. Polar icecaps show accelerated melting, especially in the northern hemisphere, and many glaciers world-wide are disappearing. Most importantly the temperatures of equatorial oceans show gains of roughly half a degree Celsius over the last 50 or so years, and heat drives the world’s weather because evaporation from the equatorial oceans puts the moisture into the atmosphere that fuels storms.

Roughly 89.5 billion acres of the earth’s surface is covered by water, and an acre-inch of water is 193,460 gallons. This means if evaporation was constant at merely an inch a year, rather than an inch or so a month, this would amount to 17.3 quadrillion gallons of water per year. That is 17.3 million billion gallons of water. Even a slight rise in the temperature of equatorial oceans means millions upon millions more gallons of water rise into the atmosphere. No one is sure exactly how much, but it all has to fall somewhere. Wherever moderate rainfall becomes scarcer and scarcer because ground cover is lost or pollution increases, floods become more common a few hundred miles away. Droughts in Chad, Sudan and Somalia correspond with floods in Mozambique and Tanzania. Droughts in Siberia are related to floods in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Alternatively, droughts in the Indus and Ganges watersheds produce floods along the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers. Drought in North America is accompanied by floods from the UK to Russia. If we reversed the conditions that lead to drought—such as bare soil and pollution—we would restore order to the atmosphere and return to normal rainfall while preventing floods. This would be an act of environmental responsibility.

 

Background

 

As earth and sky interact, we cannot revitalize the atmosphere without revitalizing the soil—in which case we should consider how wrongly most soils are fertilized. According to Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary a fertilizer is any substance that when applied to the soil makes it more fertile. However, the Fertilizer Institute and the industries behind them have secured the passage of laws requiring fertilizers to be soluble. Though the industry’s agenda is transparent, good sense says we don’t want our nutrients to be soluble, we want them to be insoluble but available—which is what occurs when the nutrients are stored and retained by the life of the soil. Then, by the teeming symbiosis characteristic of healthy soil, sufficient nutrients for robust crop production will be steadily available and the soil will be truly fertile.

Under present laws lime and other rock dusts must be advertised as soil amendments rather than fertilizers. Balanced, well-humified compost, which is even more crucial to building soil fertility, also is classified as an amendment rather than a fertilizer, as most of its nutrients are insoluble though available. On the other hand the massive use of soluble nitrogen ‘fertilizers’ such as anhydrous ammonia, urea or nitrates is like intoxicating oneself on a diet of amphetamines and ignoring healthy, balanced nutrition. Then everything goes like the clappers—until at some point it doesn’t go very well at all. Resting strong soils may return them to productivity, but eventually the collapse will be fatal if irresponsible soil practices don’t change. Obviously building soil biology and eliminating reliance on poisons would help the atmosphere immeasurably. There is a science to this. It can be done, but given the inertia of the present system it won’t be done soon. It may take massive losses in the agricultural sector for these changes to occur. In the interim what can we—who want to protect ourselves and moderate the damage—do?

 

Sequential Spraying

 

In the late 80s Hugh Courtney of the Josephine Porter Institute in Woolwine, VA was experimenting with applying the entire array of biodynamic preparations in close conjunction with each other. At a biodynamic conference on my farm we followed a sequence of evening barrel compound (BC), morning horsetail decoction (BD 508), evening horn manure (BD 500) and morning horn silica (BD 501), —thus applying all the preps Rudolf Steiner introduced in his Agriculture Course over a two day period. Courtney called it an energy balancing procedure, which he tested on his farm in Woolwine, Virginia and introduced at workshops in various parts of the country.

Hugh Courtney also suggested following up the prep sequence with milk and honey. Having a land flowing with milk and honey is a Biblical idea that implies a countryside rich in nourishment for the whole human being, both physically and spiritually. Since milk is related to calcium and the soil, the milk potency should be sprayed in the evening on the soil. As for honey, it is related to the silica activities of the daytime and should be sprayed in the air in the morning.

 

Further Experiments

 

During the late 80s, 90s and early 00s there were repeated summer droughts in the American Southeast, but wherever this sequence was employed at least technical precipitation if not outright rain followed within 72 hours. Hugh Courtney explained this as the ability of the BD preps to attract whatever was needed, and his experiments indicated that best success with making rain was likely if the sequence began in a water constellation and was completed just prior to full moon when watery forces were strongest.

Early on in the development of this procedure I started using radionics as an application of the axiom of fluid dynamics—often called the butterfly effect—that a microscopic change at a point can effect large scale changes in the medium. With an aerial map of my farm as my witness, I used my double-dial Hieronymus variable capacitance instrument with vials of the various preps as reagents along with double-dial rates that I obtained by cold scanning. I alternated applications while I fixed supper with applications when I fixed breakfast, dowsing for the duration of each application and using a timer in the circuit that would shut off the instrument while I was out at work on the farm or elsewhere. For the most part I was successful in getting timely rainfall even when the rest of Georgia was experiencing drought. On challenging occasions I learned to use color beamed into the instrument’s witness well,  along with herbal and mineral reagents, and I even used pictures and played recordings of rain—and whale songs, such exuberance!—along with my radionic programs. I became so confident of getting rain when I needed it that I gave my irrigation equipment away.

I also learned to use Malcolm Rae type equipment with cards for the biodynamic preparation patterns along with an interrupter in the circuit that turned the instrument on and off hundreds of times a minute to create the effect of myriad butterflys flapping their infinitessimal corrections rather than creating a single one off event. In 2005 I purchased a Power Radionic program for my computer from a dealer in HSCTI products in Woodstock, Georgia, ( http://www.hscti.net/index.html ) and with that I ran radionic programs on my computer—which opened up even further options.

In November, 2011 my wife, Shabari, and I flew in from Australia for the Weston A. Price convention in Dallas, TX and were shocked to see the devastation of the previous 10 months of drought. We organised a series of workshops in the Austin area focusing on sequential spraying and within the week most of the participants were rewarded by rain. But we know how much enthusiasm and diligence it takes to keep something like this going, and how easy it can be to lose confidence in the beginning. The tricks of the trade are myriad, and we share many of these on our RAIN CD, available from our website at www.quantumagriculture.com . We expect to be at the ACRES Convention in December.

 

 

Hugh Lovel and his wife, Shabari Bird Lovel live in Australia though they spend their northern winter months in Blairsville, Georgia where they hold a six day advanced course in Quantum Agriculture in early February. Shabari can be contacted at shabaribird@gmail.com and Hugh at hugh.lovel9@bigpond.com .

 

*****


Sidebar One:

 

Sequential Spraying—adapted from Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993).

 

In advance of each stirring draw 3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon bucket. If the water is chlorinated, leave overnight or stir for 30 minutes to outgas as much of the chlorine as possible. The water ideally should be warm, i.e. in the vicinity of 65 – 72℉. It may be warmed with sunlight, wood or gas, though electricity is not so ideal.

1st Evening: Barrel Compound (BC)—The first afternoon, add a one acre unit of barrel compound (⅓ cup) to three gallons of water and stir as below for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

Stirring: With arm or stirring stick, stir round and round to create a strong vortex. The water will become organized into laminar layers so that the cooler, denser layers move to the middle and sink while the warmer layers seek the edges and rise. The appearance is one of a spinning funnel and the water is organized. At this point reverse the direction of stirring. The water will churn and froth in chaos until a new vortex organizes. Once the new vortex is mature the direction is reversed again, and again, back and forth, 20 minutes each for BC and 508 and 1 hour each for 500 and 501. Every time a new vortex is established a new generation of organization is created. Organization is the basis of life, as living organisms are organized. By creating generation after generation of order, an evolution of order results. This charges up the remedy with life force while imparting the intentions and vibrations of the stirrer to the water. Then what one thinks, one grows.

Spraying: This spray should soak into the soil, much as does the dew, and should be sprinkled in the late afternoon in large droplets. Each drop radiates up to 6 feet, so there is no need for uniform coverage. Since life force flows from lower to higher concentration, spraying in this fashion will draw life force from the surrounding cosmos to the location sprayed. A pail and a wallpaper brush or whiskbroom is sufficient for applying this remedy.

1st Morning: Horsetail Decoction (508)—Prior to stirring, make a decoction, which is a brew simmered for 20 minutes, from 8 ounces of dried horsetail herb in ¾ gallon of water. In the early morning, dilute the pre-made decoction to 3 gallons with warm water and stir as above for 20 minutes. Apply this preparation to evaporate upward.

1st Evening: Horn Manure (500)—Add a one acre unit (¼ cup) of horn manure to three gallons of warm water and stir for 1 hour. Spray on the soil in large droplets.

2nd Morning: Horn Silica (501)— Add a one acre unit of horn silica (1 gram) to three gallons of water and stir as before for an hour. In summer, spray this remedy as a mist so it radiates upward into the lower atmosphere as a fine mist over the leaf canopy, perhaps chest or head high in the early morning. It may settle before evaporating, which is good. In winter, when warmth and light have receded into the earth, this should be misted directly onto the soil.

3rd Evening: Milk—In the evening, dilute a pint of milk in 3 gallons of warm water and stir for 20 minutes. This preparation should soak into the soil in large droplets.

3rd Morning: Honey—In the early morning, dilute an ounce of honey in 3 gallons of water and stir for 20 minutes. Apply as a fine mist that evaporates upward.

4th Evening: Repeat Sequence from beginning starting with barrel compost.

 

Biodynamic preparations can be obtained at a modest cost from The Josephine Porter Institute (JPI), P. O. Box 133, Woolwine, Virginia 24185-0133. Tel: (276)930 – 2463 (Mon-Fri 8am-5pm). www.jpibiodynamics.org/

 


*****

 

Sidebar Two:

 

El Niño/La Niña

 

The Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest driver of evaporation and weather. Scientists have long studied something called the Southern Oscillation or the irregular but periodic shift of tropical warmth between the western Pacific and eastern Pacific Oceans.

With an El Niño the eastern Pacific Ocean becomes noticeably warmer off the coast of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, generally around Christmas. The resulting evaporation of moisture rises into the upper atmosphere, accelerated by the Andes Mountains. This charges up the upper atmosphere with moisture which tends to shift precipitation toward the polar latitudes. This generally means droughts for large parts of the world. However, this can only go on so long before evaporation brings in cold currents in the lower ocean to replenish what evaporated. This cools off the El Niño cycle and shifts the balance of warmth back toward the western Pacific.

La Niña, on the other hand, is a condition of elevated warmth in the western Pacific where there is no wall of high mountains. This sends moisture up into the lower atmosphere driving monsoons.

Until the age of Chaos Theory the trend in science was to study things by reducing them to extreme simplicity. Scientists struggling to use a systems approach that included as many variables as possible were relegated to the fringes and sometimes ridiculed. However, with weather—as with agriculture—single factor analysis is the apex of absurdity. Fortunately the age of computing has provided the tools for modeling complex systems involving many variables.

Taken as a whole, our stable global weather cycles have been going on since the dawn of history, fed and driven by warmth and other organizational factors—though recent global warming seems to have raised our weather intensity a bit. From a longer perspective, however, the world has alternated between long glacial periods and brief inter-glacials, and the tipping points are obscure. There seem to have been periods, occasionally, where the poles melted and ocean levels were considerably higher. Presently we seem on the cusp of change, but whether that will be to a warmer cycle or an ice age is uncertain.

Chaos theory scientists acknowledge the obscurity of organizational factors by giving them such names as the “strange attractor” and the “butterfly effect”. Modeling organizational factors has been a challenge, especially for scientists who previously believed everything simply degenerated into chaos. How to describe the rise of order out of chaos?

At least we can study warmth. Obviously the earth is warmest around the equator and coolest near the poles. This means the atmosphere heats up and expands near the equator and shrinks at the poles, which is what drives weather. Around the equator the portion of the earth’s atmosphere where weather occurs—known as the troposphere—is roughly 10 miles deep, while near the poles it is only about 5 miles deep. This means that air warms and rises around the equator, and as it cools it slides off on a downhill path known as a thermocline towards the poles where it funnels down one or the other polar vortex driving winter storms. The stronger the evaporation around the equator the more strongly this drives winter storms—and the occurrence of more powerful winter storms is one of the signs of global warming.

The oceans do something similar with the Gulf Stream and the Japan Current sliding down thermoclines toward Norway and Alaska. However, the melting of the northern polar icecap may shut down the Gulf Stream’s thermocline, which has weather scientists wondering whether that means a new ice age for northern Europe and Siberia. Could global warming be the trigger for an ice age? Alas, there are many unknowns, but most notably, the oscillation of surface temperatures between the eastern and western Pacific has a pronounced effect on evaporation and thus on rainfall, with the tilt of the earth’s axis as a major factor in causing oscillations. The fact that Pacific warming trends are strongest around Christmas when the sun is furthest south earns this cycle the title of the Southern Oscillation.

As stated previously, the periodic effect of the Southern Oscillation is irregular, and the key to its better management would be identifying and understanding such organizational factors as the strange attractor and the butterfly effect. Familiarity with the biodynamic preparations as organizational factors used in agriculture is a logical starting point for such research.

 

*


****

 

Sidebar Three:

 

From Issue #6 of “Applied Biodynamics” (Winter 1993). –By Hugh Courtney
First of all, the sequential spraying technique was developed by myself, almost accidentally, in the early summer of 1988 when it appeared that we were about to face a third year of blistering drought. Frustrated by that possibility, I reasoned that surely there had to be something in biodynamic agriculture that could relieve or at least ameliorate the damage to our pastures, hayfields and gardens, after all, had not Steiner himself in the Agriculture course, (see Lecture #5, especially page 89), suggested that the preparations could help the plant attract to itself from its environment what was needed for its best growth? I thought surely, if one knew precisely what preparations to use, then relief should be available somehow. That is if one assumes that biodynamics really is valid and truly works. In my case, however, I did not have the wisdom to know the precise preparation to use.

At this point in my work with the preparations, I was convinced that it would be fairly difficult to cause harm with them, even if one used them in a situation that did not seem appropriate.
The worst thing in such a case would be that their effects could be reduced or negligible. So, I chose to use all nine of them. The six compost preparations were applied in the form of Barrel Compost (Thun recipe) along with BD #500, BD #501, and BD #508. I reasoned that I should commence in the evening with Barrel Compost, since the generally accepted biodynamic practice is to begin with the compost preparations. I followed the next morning with BD #508, and since I had been very much impressed with the work of Lilly Kolisko, and since I already had some on hand, I chose to use the fermented version of BD #508 as detailed in her work, Agriculture of Tomorrow. In the evening of the second day I applied the BD #500. On the morning of the third day, I sprayed the BD #501(c) which is a crystal silica material found in a matrix of rectorite, a clay-like substance. I had been experimenting with this form of #501 and had been very pleased with the results to this point, so it was an obvious choice for me.
Since I was treating hayfields, and was very interested in the water element anyway, I chose to apply the sequence in a leaf period, which turned out to be just before the full moon,  on the 26th, 27th and 28th of June 1988. Sometime within the following night, we received a nice, lengthy , soaking rain which totaled around .9 of an inch.